“Good Morn– ” *SLAM*

Some days you just KNOW what’s coming.

So all of those chemotherapies they gave me as a cocktail from Hell last week? Pretty sure the side effects are kicking in today.  They certainly are kicking the crap out of my blood counts:

  • White blood cell count: 0.9 (4.50-11.00 10^9/L)
  • Red blood cell count: 2.34 (4.4-6.0 10^12/L)
  • Hemoglobin: 7.2 (14.2-18.0 g/dL)
  • Hematocrit: 21.3 (40.0-54%)
  • Platelets: 27 (150-400 10^9/L)

For those who aren’t hematologists, nurses or just one of us dying from a blood cancer, it’s the hemoglobin that, at least for me, has been so low as to necessitate a blood transfusion.  Seven is the threshold but there’s wiggle room, such as when you were at nine-something two days ago.  I knew something was up this morning when I woke up exhausted after a decent nights sleep. That’s always such a bummer … bad enough to have to wake up in the first place when you don’t want to get out of bed, but on top of it immediately experiencing the low blood count version of this:

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That kills me every time.

So to back up a bit, I had an appointment today for labs and more Velcade.  My assigned nurse in the infusion center said that I didn’t actually need labs since there were some done two days ago.  I didn’t think that was correct, given expected blood count drops from the VTD-PACE, but I specifically wanted to see my hemoglobin in case I was right in thinking my exhaustion was being caused by low counts so I requested the test anyways.  Sure enough I needed blood, and there’s a lesson in there about being proactive with this stuff.  After four years I’ve become fairly well attuned to what my personal meat popsickle is going through.

Always be your own advocate!

Unfortunately it’s kind of a Pyrrhic victory. As in “great, you were right!  Now you’ll be here the rest of the day.”

Oh well.

While in the infusion room at CBCI I noticed a FELLOW patient of my doctor that I had spoken to briefly once before.  I jotted down the blog address and gave it to him, a returned favor for a business card he had given me the previous encounter.

So for obvious reasons — well, at least obvious if you read the previous blog post — I’ve been thinking about the loneliness of cancer a bit lately.  It just seems like Myeloma itself is forcing an isolation on me … which probably is about as clear as mud.   Hmm … OK, see if this makes more sense: so there’s a 1 in about 143 chance, or 0.7%, that you’ll, err, catch?  Do you catch cancer? Well whatever. So it’s 0.7% you’ll come down with a terminal case of ze Myelomas.

But then what if you’re not even in the target demographic? I know this disease is striking at younger and younger folks but when I’ve been to three different top level Myeloma centers I’m the youngest in the waiting room by a good 20 years.  Minimum. I still would have yet to actually meet (and become great friends with) another person with Myeloma had it not been for a mutual friend.

Of that population, according to a slide I saw from ASCO earlier, only about 33% are online with some form of social media. So yeah, there’s only a handful of us that are easy to find.

Being singled out in society, even if quietly with a rare disease, is a weird feeling.  A VERY weird feeling.  Like last person on the planet feeling.  Not knowing anyone who can really 100% sympathize, no fucking clue how you got this … I mean humans are no different than the moles you hit in a whack-a-mole game — safety is with the group underneath. It’s written into our genetic code.  Danger is outside the herd, through the holes.

Nobody should have to fight alone.  Especially this fucker of a battle.  It’s just a bit too much to ask of someone — a lot too much, sometimes.

Anyways, hope if you get here, my friend, you know the door’s always open — email, Twitter, whatever.  Nobody has to go through this shit alone.  And I still have every intention of taking one of your classes!

Sat down with the wife last night. She says she’s still committed to our efforts and that, as I relayed Tuesday night’s fun and my thoughts this past week, we have “different recollections” of that night.  Time will tell.  This is another reason, however, why I truly feel some sort of social worker HAS to be involved with cancer patients. The side effects of these drugs can be overwhelming if you don’t know it’s coming.

What else … oh, the big ASCO meeting is going on in Chiraq this weekend. Oddly enough I didn’t know that (took about a week off social media this past week) until I talked to a cousin who is on his way there as part of the industry.  Someday I would like to go to something like that — although I have a feeling the Adult Entertainment Expo or the local Cannabis Cup has vastly cooler giveaways, at least if you are travel planning based on cancer-related life expectancy.  Plus you can get herpes easily at the AEE (there’s probably a booth that gives it away), although I’m not going to rule that out at the other two.

Either way I’ll re-Tweet (God, I swore I’d never say that phrase out-loud, sigh) anything interesting that us plebes can understand on Myeloma.

Hmmm.  You know that’d be a neat business to own, come to think of it … a travel agency for the Doomed.  Could call it “Fuck It Travel.” High-dollar vacations for people who decided their kids were too shitty to leave anything to and want to blow the savings on one last hurrah.  I like it.

And on that note, I’m done. And as usual, I apologize for what I’m doing to this unit of new blood tonight.

Like I’m almost gone, yeah.

Sorry I didn’t post this on Tuesday; been in a bad headspace this week and wasn’t in the mood to write. Not sure I’m really ready either but I need to get a few things down and out of my brain basket.

So far so good on the VTD-PACE front.  I’ve been fairly tired but mostly just dealing with the repercussions of the massive Dex dosage.  I didn’t go into the exact dosing of this witch’s brew, but it’s:

  • Days 1, 4, 8, and 11: Bortezomib 1mg/m2 IV push over 3–5 seconds or SC
  • Day 1–4: Thalidomide 50–200mg orally daily at bedtime + dexamethasone 40mg orally daily
  • Days 1–4: Cyclophosphamide 300mg/m2 continuous IV infusion over 24 hours daily + etoposide 30mg/m2 continuous IV infusion over 24 hours daily + cisplatin 7.5mg/m2 continuous IV infusion over 24 hours daily + doxorubicin 7.5mg/m2 continuous IV infusion over 24 hours daily.

That was taken from here, BTW, which is a pretty handy web page for chemotherapy.

I’m not feeling good.  The problem is I’m not sure how to draw a demarcation line between what is happening as a result of the chemo versus what is happening as a result of marital issues.  I feel pretty deflated, at least from the previous week, and I can’t easily sort out what goes into what pile o’ sucking as easily as I wish.

Physically I feel pretty run-down, but OK for the most part.  GI is fine, blood counts have actually gone up slightly since last Friday when I was released (i.e., no transfusions needed) although they are all still pretty low.  Nausea daily, including a weird almost insta-vomit situation when I sit crunched forward a bit.  Pain is up there but I had a Neulasta shot Sunday which I think is the guilty party there.

My good attitude is pretty much gone, sadly, which I mostly attribute to my marriage. Not going into super details here but the net-net is that after so many months of peace, mostly driven (IMHO) by me beta’ing out of most issues to somehow make up for 3.5 years of Dex-driven Rich, we got into it this week and I’ve come to realize a few things that I had hoped were in the rear-view not only aren’t, but probably never will be. The unfortunate thing about trust is that once broken in a relationship, even a bad one (actually especially a bad one), there’s so much scar tissue left behind that it’s hard, if not impossible, to ever really get back to a pre-trust-issue place.

My wife thinks I’m Dexing out again. I may be, but I also was feeling really positive about things until Tuesday night and I’m not convinced she’s correct so much as anticipating and reacting to protect herself from a potential, not a reality. I don’t feel snippy, angry, negative (well I didn’t until that night, anyways).  This past weekend I just took it easy, watched my mouth and did the usual steroid thing the Doomed do when given this much of this crap:

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I posted that on Facebook and immediately had 8-9 friends tell me to come over.

Further, I don’t see any issues I brought up during our argument as anything abnormal. Sadly, although I’m happy that I chose multiple times to back off and cool down before I let something un-take-backable fly, all of this doubt has ruined my progress mentally/emotionally and left me adrift.  Now I feel like an enemy combatant again behind the lines when I’m home, and that sucks.  Mostly because I finally had let some hope creep in that we could reverse course on circling the drain, and every ounce of that is now gone.

Just once I would like actual SUPPORT during chemotherapy. Driving, errands, cooking — that’s great. It’s not SUPPORT, however, it’s busywork that would have been done anyway simply due to me working 50 a week.  I’ve driven myself to just about everything except some stem cell-related stuff years ago and roughly 2-3 appointments/hospitalizations. In four years.

A hand held.  Questions asked borne from caring, not rote. A hug. Hell I get more of that stuff from random employees at the oncologist.  Instead at home I deal with never-ending verbal reminders of how I ruined someone’s life and subtle but obvious tells that no matter what I do, how kind I am, there is no way back.  From a place that Dex took me, which seems kind of unfair.  Also gone with the rest is the faith that post-me my legacy will be my daughter being told how awesome I was, not how much of a steroided-out prick I was by someone who fell out of love years ago in this and is incapable of understanding how important that legacy is to me.

Granted I never was Mother Theresa but I wasn’t THAT fucking bad.

Tell you what — when you go through hard times you really do see what kind of human beings are around you.  Also, and this comes from someone who won a lot more in poker than they ever lost, someone sober’s first reaction is almost always the honest one. Tuck that away somewhere.

Unfortunately with my peace of mind went all of my serenity and ability to truly relax and rest at home, which is a shitty thing when you are trying to focus on a giant dose of chemo and effects that could be coming.

You get used to it, I guess.

I’m wondering when the other shoe drops with the cancer treatment.  This has caused a decent amount of anxiety on top of everything else. I tried to cancel a lab appointment next Monday, for example (that’s a two hour commitment to me given where I work and live versus my oncologist) and was told that they need to keep it to monitor my counts tightly. So that’s like two weeks post-hospitalization?

Anyhow, met with a doc for a scheduled follow-up Tuesday who had nothing new to add except for prescriptions for an anti-fungal and a anti-bacterial. Have another meeting and more tests with another doctor on Friday.

Had a bunch of epiphanies about life in the last few weeks that I was going to consolidate here but I don’t feel like it’s the time to get into those.  I did however decide that at my funeral, assuming anyone actually listens to my requests, they play this song.  Posted this up Friday when I left the hospital:

Was listening to that last Friday and realized that it meant a lot more to me than just a allegory for leaving the hospital after a week.

Sometimes I feel
Like I’m almost gone, yeah
A long, long, long way
Way from my home, yeah

Indeed.

And here … we … go.

giphy

VTD-PACE, first day of treatment.

Got to the hospital around 8:15ish in the morning. Pretty sedate day, really.  Port accessed, blood tests taken and then a lot of downtime before the pre-meds and the cocktail of Doom was ready.  I spent most of it sleeping … I’m on a new sleep aide that I started Saturday that is also supposed to help with the Dex side effects and I think it’s working a bit too well.  Thankfully I was able to just relax and get some rest today. My blood counts, for once in the last few months, were not bad enough to merit a transfusion too so yay!

For those who missed it and don’t know, VTD-PACE is a salvage chemotherapy.  Our plan is 1 of these treatments per month for 2-3 months followed by a stem cell transplant (auto, meaning my own stem cells).  This year my Myeloma started to get ornery and the numbers are a bit out of control, so “salvage.”

I’m currently getting Velcade (shot in stomach), Dex, Cisplatin, Cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin and Etoposide. I was told most of the side effects are the typical ones (nausea, fatigue, hair loss) but that each drug had it’s own idiosyncrasies in terms of dangerous ones. One can damage the heart, one can inflame the bladder, etc..  On top of that there’s a risk that the chemotherapy destroys the cells (there’s a name for this) in your blood stream that can end up causing kidney damage.  Those side effects are why I’ll be getting monitored every 6 hours until I’m released on Friday. The lenalidomide (sp?) will begin hopefully later this week as soon as it arrives (hospitals apparently don’t stock the stuff and mine hasn’t been sent yet but the oncologists are on top of it).

Because of my past with it I’m mostly concerned about the Dex. 40mg a day for 4 days or something equally as absurd. Hoping the new sleep aide who’s name I keep blanking on (I cheated and looked it up, “Zyprexa”) will help — it’s an anti-psychotic that also helps with sleep. Since I’m pretty sure they frown on blazing up a joint in the hospital room you go with whatcha’ got I guess.

I do feel hopeful by the way.  Never assume just because I tend to come across as bitter here that it equates to “hopeless.” I am bitter a bit, but it’s rare that I’m not thinking of something funny. That goes back to some MASH episode I watched decades ago, btw.  There was one I’ve never found again where Hawkeye (Alan Alda) is explaining to someone that the reason he and his friends do all of the crazy stuff is that if they didn’t, in the middle of a triage camp in Korea, they’d go insane from the horror. I 100% get that. Looking at photos of people wearing silly costumes and stuff to chemo it’s obvious to me that most of us get it.

I mean it sucks, right?  So have fucking fun with it. Met some really amazing people on staff at CBCI and the hospitals over the years just by making them laugh. After I finish this entry I have to make a list of documentaries I’ve loved for nurse Rita, another awesome nurse at PSL that I’ve worked with before.

Not only am I hopeful but I’m in a “fill it to the top and let’s kick this fucking thing’s ass” mood right now.  Enough’s enough, and if I have to live through the next two weeks with all the fun side effects, etc., I not only better get some good results or I’m, well, I dunno.  We’ll try something else and rock that. Whatever, you know?  I think being pragmatic and active in seeking treatment’s the best you can do in this situation, and I’m doing it.

With lots of cool stuff I snuck in from Trader Joe’s and hid in the closet.

Shhhh.

Nothing too deep to get into today — I’m in a good, positive mood and I’d rather not risk giving that up quite yet by getting into things. I’ve had to do some hardcore “don’t think about this” work in the last few days which, except for my daughter crying and telling me she didn’t want me to go” repeatedly (which broke me down last night) I’ve been mostly able to do. I’d like to write about my visit to the scuba shop I used to work at this week but we’ll see.  Trying to avoid the known triggers right now for obvious reasons.

One thing I would like to mention, and I’ll be putting up some sort of Surgeon General’s warning page about this when I find the motivation (and some other blog fixes I have in mind). I write to exorcise things. I do it in a style that makes it read smoothly (well, most of the time) because I did things like this for a living and learned how — I think in column format now when I write. It works brilliantly most of the time but with a caveat — those who read it tend to only see the negative things I’m writing about and assume that’s me.

It’s only half at most, though, the Mr. Hyde half.

That being said, I firmly believe EVERY cancer patient has the thoughts I write about and similar reactions even if they keep them quiet. I made this blog public because I prefer straight talk and it was frustrating to me when I was first diagnosed to not be able to find that level of brutal honesty in most of the blogs I ran across. Which is fine, right? Look not only do I think it’s great if your faith or your indomitable positive spirit is what gets you through, but I envy you in a lot of ways if you’re that person. It’s just not how I operate, and as a result this blog is going to read as bitter, angry, crass … you name it. So if you need more positive emotions I won’t be offended, promise.  Hell hook me up and I’ll check them out!

But pssssstttt … if you too get frustrated with your personalized death sentence, rest assured that others have felt it, and I’ll be your voice if you don’t want to admit that to people. I understand that too. K? I bet there’s at least one person reading this who not only would never in a million years drop an f-bomb and cringes when I do. But staring at those ceiling titles one day trying to justify all of this in your mind, you dropped one. Even if it never crossed your lips. And that’s OK. Don’t say it out loud; I’ll say it for you and it’ll be our little secret. You deserve that F-bomb, my friend. Fuck cancer, and fuck chemotherapy, and fuck what it’s done to our lives, the experiences we’ve had to have, the fear of test results, the never-ending hypochondriac level of concern when something new happens, yada yada yada.

You aren’t alone. And as I’ve discovered four years into this, neither am I.  I’m amazed in just the last month how many really neat contacts I’ve made in various cancer communities and what I’ve learned. I’m happy to help you get started with that as well, if you ever need it — just message me.

As long as you promise to understand what this blog really is and that it’s not all of me, that is.  Hope that makes sense.

Will post updates when I can. Here’s a pic as promised … one interesting thing I hadn’t seen before is the amazing nurse Kellie put brown bags over two of the chemo drips. She told me that was because some of these chemos are light sensitive.  Trippy. She also recited from memory what each does and the side effects which impressed the hell out of me. You can see the bags over the IV bags here:

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And look, that’s almost a smile!  Well sorta, the really smiley pics were just fucking goofy and as you can see I have bed head, hah.

Also that GIANT bag on the right is a 24-hour infusion. That makes your urine red, apparently.  Things that it’s amazing to know about BEFORE it happens. So thanks again awesome nurse Kellie!

Also I am not photogenic. In 46 years I have come to accept this. Goofy ears, still a bit overweight (but getting better!) and the signature scowl do not a paparazzi’s wet dream make.

Have a fun week and I’ll be in touch.

 

VTD-PACE, another SCT … must be Christmas.

I, um, yeah.

Fuck.

Got a call that registered as my oncologist yesterday, so I was emotionally unprepared when instead of a scheduler confirming something it was my entire oncology team. I apparently came up at the office’s weekly meeting.

Have some bullet points.

  • This Friday we’re stopping the Daratumumab. It’s not working on any of the numbers at this point except possibly slowing the advance of the Myeloma slightly. I’d share the numbers but for some fucking reason all of my labs show up on HealthOne’s patient portal except my Myeloma labs. USEFUL.
  • After review the team wants to proceed with VTD-PACE. I went into detail on what I know about that treatment in this entry, but I meet with one of the team on Friday to learn more and schedule it. Ninety-six hour infusion of Dexamethasone + Thalidomide + Cisplatin + Doxorubicin + Cyclophosphamide + Etoposide + Bortezomib. The first one will be in-patient, the next ones outpatient depending on the outcome and complications of the first treatment.
  • I was told that with few patient exceptions PACE works as the “fire putter-outer,” which I need now.
  • After a 50% or more reduction in my M-Spike and IgG, which they expect to happen within 2-3 treatments, they want me to do a stem cell transplant (my 2nd) six weeks later (time to recover).  This would be August-ish.
  • Once that’s done, most likely a CAR-T clinical trial. They are starting one up in September at my oncology office, but if that’s full they will refer me out.

This has broken me for the last 24 hours. Normally, or whatever the Hell that even means anymore after four years of chemotherapies and an SCT in another state, I can mentally compartmentalize bad news and just examine it in small, controllable chunks. Things like this, however, make my emotional wall about as effective as one made of sand in the face of a hurricane. I flip from this surreal sort of disbelief that this is happening, and happening so soon, to outright breaking down.

It’s hard to describe what it’s like to not be able to look at your own daughter without losing it. I have zero control right now.  I just … I can’t.  Not today, sorry.

Was sitting here thinking about how to express how I’ve felt since yesterday. With the exception of last night, when I bleached my brain out with a combination of the darkest, grittiest metal I have cranked so loud it hurt and a ridiculous amount of Crazy Train, I can’t even type the words. It’s too painful.

This is about as close as I can approximate:

Shame that show never lived up to its pilot.

As a cancer victim I’ve often marveled, usually in a disappointed sort of way, about the way my perception of life has changed after four years of this disaster. One example is how on that call yesterday I was told to probably expect more transfusions. Ever since the first one I’ve always felt guilty about being transfused, like there was someone more deserving or needy of that blood than me. I feel the same about staying in a busy hospital, like there’s always someone more deserving or needing that room and I need to apologize for taking up space and time.

The dark epiphany is realizing that no, those things exist for people like me. There’s a snap to reality there about how really sick you are that can be pretty brutal, this sudden and painful paradigm shift between looking at the worst-case scenario world you thought you understood and the universe making sure you know full-well that you are in fact in the epicenter of this nightmare.

I don’t know if that’s explainable in a real sense to people who haven’t experienced it. Let me put it this way: you know you have a terminal disease. But there are days when you KNOW you have a terminal disease.

Different levels of comprehension and reality sinking in.

Probably not going to be writing again until next week from the hospital (I promise I’ll include pics). I’ve penned a lot in the last few days, publicly and privately, and I just need Pandora’s Box closed again for now and to get off this pedestal and fade into the shadows to recharge so I can function.

On another note, as a relatively new user on Twitter I discovered two things this week:

  • You can “mute” people that your friends RT so you no longer see the RT’s. Way too much political stuff lately for someone who sits in front of several news feeds all day. I just want to hear and share cancer-related stuff so that was pretty cool — I can keep reading people’s Tweets but cull out with a lil’ work most of the non-cancer stuff I keep having to scroll past. I say this like it’s some new thing but I’m sure everyone but me knew it. I can say, however, that after a good hour of work today I have scrubbed my feed clean and it’s like a whole new experience.
  • When your feed is 99% cancer-related news and you’ve been following 5-10 new people a day from all sorts of flavors of Doom, DO NOT READ YOURSELF AWAKE IN BED WITH IT.  I can handle most stuff but I have ZERO defense against child cancer stories, which were the first things I saw from yesterday. Sobbing yourself awake as you imagine what it must feel like to be told as a parent that the therapies are being stopped and to just enjoy your remaining time together is … I can’t even imagine. I do know I’d rather be the recipient of the soap in a sock code red beating from Full Metal Jacket than ever have that experience in bed again.

I can’t turn this entry positive. I give up.

Cya’s.

Alpaca outta f%&king nowhere.

Now four years into this shitshow I’ve decided that the word “fatigue” is my least favorite side effect description.  Fatigue?  Fatigue is what you get when you’ve had too much sun at the Derby party.

“Oh Rhett, ah do declare that I’m a tad fatigued!  Can you find the negro for some more mint juleps whilst ah retire indoors?”

Sorry, that’s how I envision Derby parties: a bunch of white Southern-accented racists in stupid hats.  Your mileage may vary.

“Fatigue” is too dainty (another word I associate with Derby party-goers) a word, and it’s woefully inadequate in describing the narcolepsy-esque exhaustion I’ve had from either/both my disease and the various chemotherapies.  Which I bring up because since I started Dara, my hemoglobin is so low that I’ve had 4 transfusions in the last few months. In fact I’m typing this in on my phone (ugh) from an infusion room chair while waiting for some CBC results to see if I need another … I’ve been dead on my feet all week.

And on that note while dealing with the extreme pit of narcissism that is my mother on the phone I was just told my first blood samples, which they took again due to what they thought was a clot in the tubes, weren’t actually clotting in the tubes.  It was that there’s apparently so much protein in my blood it appeared to be clotted.

Sighville.

Bought the kiddo a stuffed animal from the gift shop while I waited for a hastily-scheduled transfusion appointment.  I know my wife thinks I spoil my daughter but there’s a purpose beyond just loving to give her stuffed animals — I think it helps when I’m delayed at appointments in the hospital or oncologist to bring her something fun to turn the experience positive.  My logic is simply that in doing so, I can hopefully erase any negative connotations for her right now with all of this.  She has been taught about death, and she knows I’m sick, but she hasn’t put the two together yet.

I just can’t go there with her quite yet — not only does she not have the maturity at 5 to really come to grips with this, I don’t think, but I had to soften it somehow since we obviously had to talk to her about it.  Between the constant doctor visits and people (irritatingly) talking about it in adult terms in front of her, it’s not like she didn’t know something was up but more importantly we were afraid she’d think I had something she could catch.  I’ll just take those tears for her in the meantime and she can have a stuffed animal instead of worrying daily that daddy won’t be coming home that day.

Speaking of tears, I’m not a giant fan of  trying to hide them in an infusion center so I’m out.  Have fun, hug the loved ones and thank you, whoever gave this, for donating the blood I needed today.  And I’m sorry for what I and some of Colorado’s finest medicinal plant life are going to do to said blood after the kiddo goes to sleep tonight when I try to relax and erase this goddamn day from my brain.

Oh but to end on a laugh, whenever something happens to me that’s a surprise (like this transfusion) my mind immediately goes to this, one of my all-time favorite memes.  Enjoy …

mekjol8

I lost this title in traffic.

One of the annoying things about chemobrain for me is I can’t hold onto thoughts any more.  I know I *had* a good title and first sentence for this entry written in my head but somehow between the hospital and my office I lost it.

I blame Dan Carlin (the Podcaster).  His two shows, “Common Sense” and “Hardcore History,” are guilty pleasures of mine and I was enjoying one on the drive to work. DAMNIT DAN CARLIN*.

* Not really, I love Dan and wish he was our President.

While I’m thinking about it, I’m not sure I’ve ever really delved into my particular flavor of chemobrain.  Perhaps most annoying is that I’ve almost totally lost the ability to digress and then get back to my original train of thought. I’ve been trying to train myself to not do this anymore as a result because the number of times I have to ask “I’m sorry, what was I talking about?” is seriously embarrassing.  My vocabulary has suffered as well — I find myself struggling to recall words I know I used to be able to find effortlessly.

I’ve said it before (I think in the last entry, come to think of it) but when all you have to trade on is your mental faculties, watching them decay is pretty dismaying.  But you know what?  The hell with it.  There are things in life you can fix, and things you can’t. I’m not going to quit treating my disease so that I can recollect and use “antediluvian” in a sentence.  I’m already tempted to just speak in animated gifs and let people wonder what I’m trying to convey anyway.

uw0n5gv

Oh, PET scan versus stupid rambling.  Had the test this morning, my second ever.  It was fairly pleasant, really. Which is odd, right? We have to do so many unpleasant and demeaning things in this war against the big C that a little Monday morning RADIATION before coffee seems like no big deal. Got the injection, had a nice chat with the tech and promptly fell asleep in the chair.

Damn you, warm blanket of warmth and sleepy warm goodness.

And damn you cancer for making the extreme so commonplace that I not only can sleep through something that by all rights should be terrifying, but instead be thankful that I got some extra rest instead of having to sit at work.

So weird.

Anywho, after 45 minutes to let the radioactive sugar (think that’s what they use) percolate, the tech had me go into the giant expensive machine and I again fell asleep during both scans (lower body and upper body were done one after the other after shifting positions).  Really the only thing that really bothered me about this morning is it occurred to me that it’s total bullshit that I’ve now been irradiated several times by professionals and I STILL don’t have any cool superpowers.  How lame is that? I can’t even have like the ability to instantly find a good ramen shop anywhere?  I could be Captain Umami or something. As terribad as the last Avengers movie was there’s probably room for me now on the team.

*sounds of Avenger’s doing Avenger-y stuff: crash clang bite meow bzzzaaappp squish squish*

*cut to Captain Umami noisily slurping some shoyu ramen and giving the camera the middle finger*

Once finished with the PET scan I wobbled to my car in a sleepy fog and went to Starbucks for the morning triple venti no foam soy latte.  I almost wish I had done the recommended blood transfusion at last Friday’s Dara session but with the later-than-usual start time I wouldn’t have been home until like 7 pm at 2 hours per bag.  The PA that met with me pre-Dara last Friday, Sarah (who rocks socks and has almost as many “ooh, shouldn’t have let the kiddo listen to that song” stories as I do) said my numbers were iffy in terms of needing a transfusion but I could wait a week. As a result, zero energy right now to the point where I’m tempted to see if they can fit me in earlier than this Friday.  Hell I got tired doing my own laundry this weekend.  And I’m not in THAT bad a shape.

Also if my 5-year-old cutest-ever princess of a daughter suddenly notes very seriously that “Wu-Tang Clan ain’t nothin’ to fuck with” to you, please just nod knowingly and let me know so I can feel the appropriate amount of guilt and then figure out how to blame my wife. Thanks.

So back to ze PET scan. As I get back into the car at the Starbucks parking lot I grabbed the card o’ discharge instructions.

There was one.

“Drink lots of water.”

For radiation?

Look I’m not a nuclear physicist but something about “drink a bunch of water” to get rid of being irradiated just doesn’t sound right. I mean I’m sure it’s probably safe.  That’s why the techs bring the injection in a metal box, have the needle to do the injection encased in metal and have the nuke picture everywhere.  But you?  You’re fine! Just drink some water.

HMMMM.

Curious to see how much this Monday morning adventure cost.  Well cost my insurance company, at least until they stop covering me.  Which I’m not even going to get into because there’s so much hype and bullshit out there right now about this TrumpCare business that it’s just not worth it to dwell on here.  For reference I believe ALL politicians are inhuman soulless scum and this is just the latest example, but I really don’t want to get political beyond that. I hope it works out and even more I hope those who created this new mess, instead of thoughtfully fixing what was already in place, know (as new Twitter friend @MightyCasey recently put it to one of her local politicos): Winter is Coming.

But whatever.  Just like being irradiated pre-latte there are things I can influence and change, things I cant, and this is not a platform for either. I am truly sorry for those of you who were severely affected by anxiety over this stuff and probably continue to be. As someone who has struggled for the past four years since diagnosis with many of those around me adding to my stress instead of trying to help relieve it, I feel your pain, and last week was scary for me as well.

It has, inadvertently, added fuel to the “drug costs are too high” argument though. I found this article this morning which I really enjoyed.  I love how big pharma tries to play this issue off on PBMs and won’t tell you the “real” cost after discounts, PBM backroom sorcery and other assorted bullshit FOR YOUR OWN GOOD, CITIZENS.

Jackasses.

As someone who not only has taken a lot of cancer drugs but who also takes Revlimid and recommends Celgene stock for my clients, it amazes me that this is allowed. Then again perhaps not, given that we’re talking about the largest lobbying group by political donation in the States. Who are also fighting (along with police unions, prison unions, etc.) marijuana legalization because being on the wrong side of history is fun for the whole family and who cares about suffering, people!  Give those whiners opioids and tell them to shut the fuck up.

Not going there (marijuana policy) today, been in a good mood all weekend even with the exhaustion and that’s a HUGE hot button issue with me. A little snark and it’s time to move on.  To …

To … um, hmm.  I guess that’s it for the core dump today.  I probably needed some crafty pithy thing to say next but I’m just too tired to be pithy today. I’m pith poor (which is much more amusing if you say it in Mike Tyson’s voice). So here’s to hoping my PET scan has something good to show us and when I hear something I’m guessing you’ll be one of the first to know.