Insert title here.

Got a few things to get into today, so let’s get to it.

First, the good news.  Although premature, I have my first results from the VTD-PACE “kill it with fire” chemotherapy, and it looks like it’s actually working!  My oncologist is stoked (his exact word), in fact:

  • M-Spike down to 3.1 from 3.9
  • IgG down to 4,718 from 5,363
  • Kappa down to 575 from 1,314

The down-from’s are late April and May #’s. Given that the latest numbers should lag treatment by about two weeks, according to my oncologist team, that’s a big deal that they are dropping so rapidly already. It’s even a bigger positive given that I tolerated the treatment at, as the nurse practitioner said, a 9.5 out of 10 — basically breezing through it. Doesn’t feel like that, but I know it could be much worse. Outside of reactions to the drugs my biggest problems have been low blood counts (which are currently rebounding, finally), exhaustion and nausea.

So yay me.

I am having one problem that hopefully we addressed yesterday. Ever since treatment started I’ve had this weird nausea and upper stomach area pain where it hits instantly when I crunch my stomach forward — how to explain this, hmm.  Like when you are sitting down and lean forward on a table or desk? I get instantly sick to my stomach to the point where I could easily throw up.  I have a prescription for a new med to take which I’ve conveniently forgotten the name of and we’re doubling the Omeprazole dosage I already take for chemo-related GI stuff (I think it’s the steroids that cause that but who knows).  Hoping this new regimen works because I’m at a desk either working or playing for most of my waking hours.

The next cycle of VTD-PACE begins on the 19th. After discussing it with Megan (the NP) and my wife I’m going to do it in-patient again. The oncology team doesn’t care either way, but since I don’t mind the hospital it just seems safer to me. I think I walk around partially dehydrated most days and I’m concerned that doing this treatment outpatient, besides just being a pain in the ass given how far I live from the clinic, might put me in danger of the things they watch out for in the hospital (including some nastiness if you are dehydrated, apparently). I also have no easy way of getting down there if, for example, I need a 4 am transfusion and I’m at home.

OK so I’m only doing it in-patient because I can order ramen and Fat Sully’s pizza.  Shhhh.

BTW I’m currently in the process of putting together a long-overdue Excel spreadsheet showing my #’s for the past four years combined with what treatments I was on and when.  I’ll publish them here when I’m done — just waiting for some data from my current oncologist.  Plus I need to launch an archaeological mission under my desk to find all of my lab result paperwork from the first year of having this disease. I’ll wear a cool hat and bring a bullwhip. And if history’s any guide I’ll smash my head into the bottom of my desk as usual and curse like a sailor.

Next up, ASCO. Although ASCO is, according to my oncologists, usually more targeted at the big four cancers, there were two huge announcements regarding CAR-T successes from this last one.  First, Nanjing Legend Biotech announced startling results from an early stage trial of their anti-BCMA CAR-T cell drug, LCAR-B38M. Thirty-three out of 35 patients (94%) went into remission with an objective response rate of 100% — crazy stuff.  As my oncologist and several others on Twitter I’ve read have noted, however, Chinese trial results need to be taken with a grain of salt.

Closer to home, Bluebird Bio and Celgene announced amazing results about THEIR anti-BCMA CAR-T therapy, BB2121.  In a clinical trial of patients no longer responsive to a prior stem cell transplant and a median of seven prior therapies, the 15 patients (out of 18) that received the highest doses had some great response rates. Twenty-seven percent achieved a complete response, 47% achieved a very good partial response and the remaining four patients were in partial response.

As noted before my oncologist’s plan is to do 1-2 more VTD-PACE cycles followed by a stem cell transplant (my second) and then a CAR-T clinical trial, so it’s really encouraging to see this.  I also learned a tiny bit more about CAR-T trials this week — if I have to travel for one, for example, I need to plan on about a month.  Basically the process is similar in protocol to a stem cell transplant as I understand it — while your blood is shipped out to have whatever voodoo magic done to it that they do, you are in the hospital doing chemo to prepare to receive it back and then watched like a hawk.

But that’s a problem for another day.

Alright, time to dip into the jar o’ pithiness. Was twisted pretty good the other night and managed to write down one of the many epiphanies I have on nights like that. Here’s what I woke up to find:

Every day I’m around is one day older the little girl crying and screaming “I want my daddy” is in my nightmares about my death from cancer and how it will impact her life.  If I had to distill why I can’t think about my future without breaking down, it’s that.  That’s it, the entirety.  I feel like no matter what I do I cannot NOT cause her pain.  Does that make sense?

And yes, I do have the skill to make an entire room go from normal to awkward in one paragraph — why do you ask? Snicker.

Ariana (my daughter) has been on my mind a lot lately — with all of her activities plus the week-long hospitalizations and “salvage” chemos these days it’s hard not to. She just graduated from preschool, which was adorable. At her pre-kindergarten orientation they gave her a t-shirt that claimed “Class of 2030.” Crazy. She’s also in a new phase where she wants to help with everything I’m doing now, which I need to remember to encourage as much as possible.

Problem is, and this is unavoidable, it obviously brings up hard emotions as well. You have to understand my mindset.  For example there’s a new video game coming out in November that I skipped pre-ordering because my first mental instinct was to ask if I’ll even be around this November … pretty sure I will be but this is how I see the future beyond a few days out. I want to be here in 2030 to see her graduate, God damnit. I want to teach her to drive, be her best friend when she has bad days in school, and help teach her algebra.  I want to make her feel better about having to have braces, and share with her my favorite music and movies.  I want to take drum lessons with her, and most of all go on dive vacations with her.

Lately we’ve been doing duets of Disney tunes, mostly the Moana song “How Far I’ll Go.” She sings it all the time so I learned it on guitar the other night so we can play together. I love this but it breaks my heart too, you know?  Maybe she becomes a famous singer someday — but I won’t be here to see it, most likely.  That’s the problem with cancer.

Oh and yes I know there’s a 4-year-old and her daddy who’ve become internet-famous doing this, BTW. Ariana sings better than that girl and I seriously doubt her dad has anywhere near the Iron Maiden collection I have, so screw them and their infinite cuteness and talent.

Seriously, though, I just hope she remembers those nights we sat on the couch and how I smiled at her, you know? Maybe someday she’ll understand that smile and the tears that I was trying to hide.

All the good in my life, the things I truly care about, always have a “but …” tacked on the end. I know in some ways it keeps me grounded but it’s too much — it taints everything, gives it all a metallic aftertaste.  Thanks rare cancer! So yeah … every day I get is one more day closer to my goals (experiencing her life with her) and one day older and more capable, at least in my mind, she is of dealing with the aftermath should I pass away from this fucking disaster.

I really need to start writing down more of what I think about in the wee hours of the night when I’m happily medicated. I hate waking up and knowing I came up with some new Earth-shattering thought but forgot what it was.

Lastly, and so as not to end on a total bummer, I’ve decided that regardless of my blood counts I want to go diving again. Not tomorrow, but perhaps after the stem cell transplant I’m going to reassess where I’m at and see if my doctor will prescribe antibiotics and anti-fungals prophylactically so I can safely do so.  I’m in dire need of not only a vacation but the feeling of diving again — I can’t take it anymore. I want to float, weightless, without beeps and rings and doctor visits and text messages and chemotherapy and the rest of this turned-south always connected never-good-news life I’m trodding through.

Going into the usual Social Media blackout for the weekend, so have fun and see you on the flip side.  Next doctor’s appointment is next Wednesday so I’d imagine I’ll be writing something around then-ish.

“Good Morn– ” *SLAM*

Some days you just KNOW what’s coming.

So all of those chemotherapies they gave me as a cocktail from Hell last week? Pretty sure the side effects are kicking in today.  They certainly are kicking the crap out of my blood counts:

  • White blood cell count: 0.9 (4.50-11.00 10^9/L)
  • Red blood cell count: 2.34 (4.4-6.0 10^12/L)
  • Hemoglobin: 7.2 (14.2-18.0 g/dL)
  • Hematocrit: 21.3 (40.0-54%)
  • Platelets: 27 (150-400 10^9/L)

For those who aren’t hematologists, nurses or just one of us dying from a blood cancer, it’s the hemoglobin that, at least for me, has been so low as to necessitate a blood transfusion.  Seven is the threshold but there’s wiggle room, such as when you were at nine-something two days ago.  I knew something was up this morning when I woke up exhausted after a decent nights sleep. That’s always such a bummer … bad enough to have to wake up in the first place when you don’t want to get out of bed, but on top of it immediately experiencing the low blood count version of this:

giphy

That kills me every time.

So to back up a bit, I had an appointment today for labs and more Velcade.  My assigned nurse in the infusion center said that I didn’t actually need labs since there were some done two days ago.  I didn’t think that was correct, given expected blood count drops from the VTD-PACE, but I specifically wanted to see my hemoglobin in case I was right in thinking my exhaustion was being caused by low counts so I requested the test anyways.  Sure enough I needed blood, and there’s a lesson in there about being proactive with this stuff.  After four years I’ve become fairly well attuned to what my personal meat popsickle is going through.

Always be your own advocate!

Unfortunately it’s kind of a Pyrrhic victory. As in “great, you were right!  Now you’ll be here the rest of the day.”

Oh well.

While in the infusion room at CBCI I noticed a FELLOW patient of my doctor that I had spoken to briefly once before.  I jotted down the blog address and gave it to him, a returned favor for a business card he had given me the previous encounter.

So for obvious reasons — well, at least obvious if you read the previous blog post — I’ve been thinking about the loneliness of cancer a bit lately.  It just seems like Myeloma itself is forcing an isolation on me … which probably is about as clear as mud.   Hmm … OK, see if this makes more sense: so there’s a 1 in about 143 chance, or 0.7%, that you’ll, err, catch?  Do you catch cancer? Well whatever. So it’s 0.7% you’ll come down with a terminal case of ze Myelomas.

But then what if you’re not even in the target demographic? I know this disease is striking at younger and younger folks but when I’ve been to three different top level Myeloma centers I’m the youngest in the waiting room by a good 20 years.  Minimum. I still would have yet to actually meet (and become great friends with) another person with Myeloma had it not been for a mutual friend.

Of that population, according to a slide I saw from ASCO earlier, only about 33% are online with some form of social media. So yeah, there’s only a handful of us that are easy to find.

Being singled out in society, even if quietly with a rare disease, is a weird feeling.  A VERY weird feeling.  Like last person on the planet feeling.  Not knowing anyone who can really 100% sympathize, no fucking clue how you got this … I mean humans are no different than the moles you hit in a whack-a-mole game — safety is with the group underneath. It’s written into our genetic code.  Danger is outside the herd, through the holes.

Nobody should have to fight alone.  Especially this fucker of a battle.  It’s just a bit too much to ask of someone — a lot too much, sometimes.

Anyways, hope if you get here, my friend, you know the door’s always open — email, Twitter, whatever.  Nobody has to go through this shit alone.  And I still have every intention of taking one of your classes!

Sat down with the wife last night. She says she’s still committed to our efforts and that, as I relayed Tuesday night’s fun and my thoughts this past week, we have “different recollections” of that night.  Time will tell.  This is another reason, however, why I truly feel some sort of social worker HAS to be involved with cancer patients. The side effects of these drugs can be overwhelming if you don’t know it’s coming.

What else … oh, the big ASCO meeting is going on in Chiraq this weekend. Oddly enough I didn’t know that (took about a week off social media this past week) until I talked to a cousin who is on his way there as part of the industry.  Someday I would like to go to something like that — although I have a feeling the Adult Entertainment Expo or the local Cannabis Cup has vastly cooler giveaways, at least if you are travel planning based on cancer-related life expectancy.  Plus you can get herpes easily at the AEE (there’s probably a booth that gives it away), although I’m not going to rule that out at the other two.

Either way I’ll re-Tweet (God, I swore I’d never say that phrase out-loud, sigh) anything interesting that us plebes can understand on Myeloma.

Hmmm.  You know that’d be a neat business to own, come to think of it … a travel agency for the Doomed.  Could call it “Fuck It Travel.” High-dollar vacations for people who decided their kids were too shitty to leave anything to and want to blow the savings on one last hurrah.  I like it.

And on that note, I’m done. And as usual, I apologize for what I’m doing to this unit of new blood tonight.

The bad sevens.

Not even sure where to begin this.

I guess just the facts to start.  Tuesday night I started feeling a bit run down with a tiny productive cough and some minor nasal congestion.  Given all the craziness of the last two weeks (IViG, blood transfusions, bone marrow biopsy, the usual weekly chemo, the Neulasta shot, etc.), I was inclined to think it was just the aftershocks of all of that.  Wednesday I woke up and felt like Hell … low energy, body aches, the nasal/chest congestion.  Went to work but came home at lunch on my last personal drop of energy and slept until about 10 pm.  By then I had developed the sweats, chills and a 102.3 temperature.

Waiting until morning we contacted CBCI and they gave me an appointment, but after waiting an extra 30 minutes in their office past my appointment time we realized they were so slammed that I might as well just go to the ER downstairs.  The ER did the usual stuff (chest x-rays, cultures, blood tests) and decided I had pneumonia again, so the wife and kiddo went home to get Ari to pre-school while I waited for the inevitable admission to the hospital.  They brought me up to the oncology ward and I’ve been here ever since, fighting what they now tell me is the flu.  Let’s see … sweats, chills, full body pain, cough, nasal congestion, zero energy (due to damn near zero hemoglobin again), nausea and the kitchen sink.  Thankfully the wonderful nurses here have been a big help even slammed (I got the last bed in this ward, which for whatever reason I always feel guilty about), and the Dilaudid and now Oxycodone (Dilaudid works great but gives me a headache at the end of every dose) have gotten rid of the pain.

They’ve done nothing for my mental state.

Even though I was forced to skip chemo this week my counts are still really low, so I’ve had 3 transfusions in as many days.  More disconcerting, however, is I met with my oncologist today at the hospital to discuss my treatment and bone marrow biopsy results from Monday.  Since the beginning of March and this Daratumumab / Revlimid / steroid therapy my M-spike has gone from 4.4 to 3.5 in just over a month.  That’s great, right?  Problem is my kappa is going the opposite direction and I get the feeling that the doctors are a bit confused by that (apparently they usually march in the same direction).  Not sure where my IgG is but I’ll try to find it.  Anyways here’s the scary part — my plasma is 90%, according to the bone marrow biopsy.  As I understand it what that means is in the sample they took from my pelvis on Monday placed on a slide, 90% of the white blood cells are monoclonal (bad) plasma cells.

My oncologist didn’t say it, but I’ve done enough reading to know that that’s probably why my counts are so bad — the good blood cells are being crowded out by the bad ones.  He wants a few more data points so we’re going to continue this for a few more weeks but chances are he is going to change strategies soon.

I’ll be honest, I’m kind of heartbroken by all of this.  I’m just so tired of it all.  I’ve been slogging through this fucking mess for what, 4 years now?  And there hasn’t been a break.  Chemo after chemo after stem cell transplant after chemo after chemo ad nauseum.  Barely a partial remission, and when I took a two month chemo holiday this year for my surgery my numbers almost doubled.  I feel like this burden just gets heavier, and heavier, and heavier.

So here we are, realistically at what could be near the end of the journey I’m guessing?  I have 90% bad cells and my counts are low, so where do I go from there?  Now I have no idea.  And you know what?  If this is it, I’ll be honest — part of me doesn’t even care.  I read about these folks who have done 20 years with Myeloma and I don’t know that I have that strength even if I’m given the time.  I just need 13 more years to get Ariana out of high school and I feel like that’s being taken away now as well.

I can’t even mentally go there right now, I’ll be out the goddamn window.

Just once, I would have liked to had a blood test that showed whatever we were doing was working amazingly well.  But man, not one in four years now.  I can’t describe how brutal that is, week in and week out, to try to summon just a tiny drop of hope and watch it get squashed every time.  I’m tired of doctors and nurses and hospitals — I like the folks but seriously.  I can barely even work now I’m down here so much.  Sick of being afraid to kiss my daughter, and having to wash my hands like I have OCD.  The dumb thing is the IViG at least has been working — I haven’t really been sick since I started it except for this stupid flu (which I’m not sure IViG could deal with anyways).

I’d like to think I took a lot of this in stride.  I had to give up diving and my path to become a diving instructor, a real passion of mine, and even though I knew it was fucking dumb I kept up hopes that someday I could safely do that stuff again with my immune system.  I go to most of my appointments alone because even though I appreciate the support I don’t want to put this cloud over other people.  Plus I’ve found having folks there at times can make the emotional wall crack, especially if it’s my daughter.  I didn’t really even want much from life anymore — time with the people I care about, their health, and some quiet time to ponder things.

I give up, this entry is going nowhere.  Sorry.  I guess this is where I’m supposed to get religious as a cancer victim now, right?  Yeah.  Problem is the only God in my world is Random Number Jesus and he just keeps rolling the bad 7’s for me, one after the other.

Oh.  Have a positive attitude Rich!  Keep your chin up!

Yeah I’ll get right on that.

My hips are a code violation.

Eventful week, and not really in a good way.

So Friday I went in for the weekly Dara appointment, but there were problems with my CBC (“complete blood count”) results.  Namely that my red blood cell count was in the danger zone.

giphy

Sorry, Archer joke.  Here’s what the danger zone looks like, apparently, with my number and then the “OK” range in parenthesis and a description of what each one is (that I shamelessly copied/pasted from webmd.com):

  • Hematocrit 18.8% (40-54%).  This test measures the amount of space (volume) red blood cells take up in the blood.  The value is given as a percentage of red blood cells in a volume of blood.
  • Red Blood Cell 2.14 10 12/l (4.4-6.0 10 12/l).  RBC’s carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body, and carry carbon dioxide back to the lungs.  If the count is low (anemia), the body may not be getting the oxygen it needs.
  • Hemoglobin 6 g/dl (14.2-18 g/dl).  the hemoglobin molecule fills up the red blood cells.  It carries oxygen and gives the blood cell its red color.  The hemoglobin test measures the amount of hemoglobin in blood and is a good measure of the blood’s ability to carry oxygen throughout the body.
  • Platelet Count 78 10 9/l (150-400 10 9l).  Platelets are the smallest type of blood cell.  They are important in blood clotting.  When bleeding occurs, the platelets swell, clump together, and form a sticky plug that helps stop the bleeding.  If there are too few platelets, uncontrolled bleeding may be a problem.

Anyhow, the doctors decided to keep the Dara appointment but prescribed two bags of blood.  Thankfully I ran my errands the day before, since that added four hours to my day.  Easter weekend itself wasn’t horrible although I was exhausted all weekend even with good sleep.  Saturday my daughter Ariana had belt testing at her TKD gym and did great, then Amy’s parents came up to celebrate Easter since my mother-in-law had to fly out Easter Sunday.  They set up an egg hunt outside which she loved.  Sunday we met my parents in Cherry Creek briefly after lunch at one of our favorite seafood restaurants, Blue Island Oyster Bar.

So Monday comes around and it’s IViG time.  The CBC from Monday looked about the same as Friday’s, just minor improvements.  Due to my numbers last week my doctors asked for a bone marrow biopsy, my fourth now, to give the doctors a better picture of what’s going on with my disease.  Not wanting to inconvenience anyone I opted for no anesthesia and just did it with a local — really didn’t hurt much at all and was vastly quicker than doing it with the fun drugs in the hospital.

Do those holes grow back, by the way?  I need to ask my doctors that.  Feel like my hips must look like Swiss cheese now.  Seeing as how my hips are, as far as I know, load-bearing, I’m pretty sure I’m not up to code anymore.

Had trouble sleeping last night, although I was in a great mood last night.  Oddly I think the non-Dex steroids might be IMPROVING my mood.  Lord knows I had enough between Friday and Monday, Jesus.  Even a good mood couldn’t keep the pain away though — spent most of the night uncomfortably sitting at my home office desk and fighting off what seems like a minor cold and a minor temperature (99, at 101 I’m supposed to call the doctor).  Came to work today since I missed Monday and will miss Thursday (Dara day this week) but popped an Oxy when I sat down and I’m just trying to relax and not move my hips.

Sorry for the inelegance of the first part of this entry — just sort of core dumping the last 4 days and I can’t think 100% clearly today thanks to the body aches and pains.  I wanted to jot some notes down about just that, however.  I’m wondering, as I’m sure a lot of the doomed do, if it’s possible to separate out what is causing what pain-wise.  While driving to work this morning I was thinking about this — whether the bone pain I am feeling is the Myeloma and not just side effects from something else.  Hard to know — I’ll ask the doctor but I’m guessing that there’s no way of knowing.

I’ll be honest, I’m a lil’ freaked out.  Just a little, mind you, but there’s something truly un-nerving about watching parts of your body and its systems fail.  The irony that what’s beating me up so bad (presuming this is chemo drug-related) is actually working so far hasn’t escaped me either.  It would be nice to catch a little break here — I have yet to really have phenomenal results from any of the five or six treatments I’ve done so far, which really is a bit scary.

So is the NOT knowing.  Which drug’s working on me?  Revlimid or Dara?  That’s the problem with so many variables.  I was demo’ing a new app on my iPhone last night to help me track dosages for hospital and doctor visits since I can’t remember all of this stuff, and the sheer number of things I take always makes me wonder how you really know which one’s putting in the real work.

Anyways it will be interesting to see what they do Thursday with my Dara treatment.

Straightening out the curves.

Thanks to input from a friend I decided to move my blog from Blogger to WordPress, which has been pretty easy.  Not so easy, however, has been the emotional impact of having to go back and read the whole thing to tag everything right, get the formatting fixed, etc.

Whoops.

In doing so, however, I realized there is a lot of information missing, gaps in the story that I should probably fix.  I know I don’t have all of the information some want readily available — I think I’m a bad blood cancer patient, honestly.  Everyone I talk to leads with their numbers like they’re introducing themselves as Patrick McGoohan’s Number 6 from ‘The Prisoner’ … “I am M-Spike 1.9 IgG 2,400,” if you will.  Me, I barely pay attention. What difference does it make?  I know the trends.  I have an incurable but treatable cancer, which sounds good except when you’ve already blown through several treatments in less than that many years you start wondering just how “treatable” it is.  Plus if I knew my #’s better I’d be a walking ball of anxiety.

I often ponder putting together an Excel spreadsheet tracking it all, the typical “hi, I work in finance” answer to the world’s problems.  Much like a surfer waiting for a wave to ride, as anyone who partakes can tell you I’ve been waiting for a good solid Dexamethasone blast o’ energy to do that.  Have a box with all of the lab results and paperwork just waiting for the chemical motivation to kick in.

So of course I just got taken off of Dex.

Someday, Excel, SOMEDAY.

Dex, for those unaware, is the steroid they add to EVERY (seemingly) chemo treatment I’ve seen so far for multiple myeloma.  My understanding is it increases the efficacy of the chemo drugs, allowing for a lower chemo drug dosage?  Either way with very few exceptions I’ve been on this crap for almost four years now, and sometimes if you get the timing down you can be super productive.  I cannot tell you how many times I’ve re-organized our pantries, the garage, the spare closets … great drug if you don’t mind the weight gain and ‘roid rage that accompanies it.

Anyhow, we’ve entered rambling town, so let’s rein it back in a bit.  Like I was saying,  when reading back through things I found a lot of gaps and events that don’t make sense unless you know a bit more about what was happening at the time.  While I don’t write here to tell a clean, linear story, I bow to the logic that one needs to be told at least to a certain degree.  So a few things that I think will help color in the gaps:

  • Diagnosed in mid-2013 when some GI-related blood tests for recurrent diverticulitis showed red flags.  Went to RMCC at Rose for further testing, second opinion at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN with Dr. Arleigh McCurdy.  Decide to have MC “take over” my care with the local oncologist, Dr. Alan Feiner, at RMCC in charge of administrating everything locally.
  • Began CyBorD chemotherapy, consisting of Cytoxin, Velcade and Dexamethasone.  Velcade was done at RMCC at Sky Ridge, the closest RMCC to my office / home.
  • Dr. McCurdy quit the MC for husband’s job but recommended her colleague, Dr. Joe Mikhael, at the Arizona Mayo Clinic.  Went down to meet with him, have him take charge of my care, and plan for a stem cell transplant.
  • Began therapy locally, and eventually anti-depressants.
  • Temporarily move to Arizona in February 2014 for autologous stem cell transplant (“SCT”) at the Mayo Clinic (Day Zero = 2/26/2014, some consider that their new birthday for some reason).
  • Back to Colorado in late March 2014 (30-day post transplant mark).
  • Summer 2014, 100-day SCT results don’t indicate remission, Dr. Mikhael begins Revlimid with Dexamethasone as a treatment.
  • September 2014, lower Revlimid dosage (too hard on my blood cell counts) from 25 mg to 15 mg.
  • January 2015, switch local oncologist from Dr. Feiner at RMCC to Dr. Matous at CBCI.
  • February 2015, Dr. Matous adds Ninlaro (oral version of Velcade) to Revlimid and Dex therapy.
  • Summer-ish 2015, Dr. Matous ends Ninlaro, adds Biaxin for a few months (BiRD).
  • Tried to wean off of Lexapro (the way you are supposed to).  Bad idea, turns out I was relying on it a lot more than I thought!
  • May 2016, start clinical trial for Pomalyst, Dex and ACY-241.
  • Mid-2016ish begin intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) since I’m getting sick (pneumonia) on almost a monthly basis.
  • October / November 2016, decide to stop going to Mayo Clinic.

So that should clear up a few blanks, anyhow.  Again it would probably be more helpful if I had all the #’s handy to show my stats at some of those bullet points, sorry.  I also feel like there’s a lot that happened in 2015 as well that I’m forgetting but I wrote nothing down — let’s just call 2015 a rough year and move along.  So mix in 4 hospitalizations for pneumonia in 2016, 3-4 diverticulitis attacks and here we are ready for a stomach surgery and off any chemotherapy (and out of that clinical trial).  That should bring things up to date, but thanks to chemobrain I may add to this later.

Oh yeah, the Mayo Clinic decision at the end there?  Given that I was in the clinical trial this year and Dr. Matous and Mikhael were pretty much eye-to-eye on everything to begin with, I made the call to can the MC trips after having to cancel two at the end of the year due to illness.  I love Dr. Mikhael but it became kind of silly for me to blow $1k or more every three months while in the trial to go down there and have him look over things that we couldn’t really change (since I was in a trial).  Perhaps someday I’ll go back but I have full faith in Dr. Matous and CBCI for now, and if I do another SCT it will be at PSL here with the CBCI crew instead of in Arizona again.

Shame, I’ll miss the banana bread french toast at Butterfields and Z Tejas.  And renting a Mercedes from Sixt — sometimes along with “food for the soul” you need an auto for the soul as well.

I wanted to address something from a comment last week because I’ve been pondering it the last few days.  In it the mother of a friend who is going through chemotherapy for another form of cancer noted that she didn’t know how I could “bounce back” from a failed trial.

Here’s the happy smiley cancer answer, which I’m posting in this blog from atop Mt. Everest after doing a free-climb without oxygen for blood cancers right before a helicopter whisks me away to a raw vegan meal so I have some energy for the 1,000k or whatever marathons are called now I’m running in this afternoon and then tonight where there’s a photo shoot for just my smile because gosh ducky darnit, I’m just so happy and lucky to have cancer and yay puppies!  There’s always another wonderful chemotherapy to try, and we’re all sure the next one’s going to have less side effects and I’ll be on it 20 years from now!  Hey here’s my two dogs now, Hope and Cure, to tell you in doggy sign language about how me having cancer has improved their lives!  So buck up, little trooper, there’s nothing to worry about!

Have you met that person yet?  They always seem fake to me.  I know that’s unfair, but I can’t help it.  Nor can I help wanting to punch them in the nuts.  People like that, in situations like this, make you feel even worse than you normally do in my opinion.  You can’t really say anything either, because we’re all fighting the same battle.  Hell I envy those people, although I question whether they really exist — either way it doesn’t work for me.  Either it feels like I’m lying to myself, or I’m lying to myself.  So how do you really deal with bad news on this wonderful path we’re on?

Anyways, here’s the secret:  I don’t think about it.

So just don’t think about your cancer, folks.  Next question?

Really though, that is the answer.  This is a horror show that never ends.  It doesn’t take a day off.  No matter what I do this cloud doesn’t go away.  It’s in every car I drive, every waiting room, every ceiling tile I stare at in a hospital.  It sits next to me at lunch, picks the radio station and next song on my commutes.  I strap it in right after Ari is in her car seat, and I tuck it in at night right next to me.  In fact there’s only one place I’ve found so far it doesn’t penetrate on its own, and I guard that jealously because it’s the only real relief I’ve had in almost four years.

I will die from multiple myleloma, most likely.  My daughter’s daddy will be taken away.  And if that’s not bad enough, because I’ve always had guilt issues, I feel a CRUSHING amount of guilt over that fact on a daily basis (the daughter bit).  It taints every possible thing I do, bar none.  So I’m driving to, say, work, and instead of the usual daydreams you’d get doing that I get a sudden image of my daughter crying in some hospital about why daddy didn’t take care of himself better so he didn’t die.  Or I replay actual conversations I’ve overheard between my daughter and wife about how daddy can’t play right now because he’s sick and needs his rest (that happens more than I’d like).

I can keep listing those, but this isn’t Monday Depression Spiral with your host, Rich.  How do you deal with the constant stream of disappointment?

Simple. You don’t.

What else can you do?

Should I blast out of my chair in the doctor’s office, shake my fist at the sky and scream “Why, WHY??!!” in some Oscar-winning performance every time we swap to a new chemo?  That just sounds exhausting.  Maybe I could shout about how it’s all so unfair?

So I suck it up, get in the car, try not to think about my daughter and if I do, save the tears until the sunglasses are on and just drive, man.  Music up, all energy on banishing any thought.  Just another day.  Don’t think.  Do.  It’s just a day, just a moment in time.  Because in the end, and this is really the point, I have to function, regardless of what LabCorp or a doctor says.  I have a kiddo, and a mortgage, and responsibilities.

I am going to die from this.

“Oh well.”

Does that seem cavalier?  I’ve been dealing with the concept of my own demise daily since I was diagnosed.  I don’t want to die (well mostly I don’t), but I’ve had almost four years to come to grips with the concept.  I’m not surprised anymore.  Trust me I’ve gone over every possible permutation, scenario … it just doesn’t bother me a hell of a lot at this point.  So what is the point of stressing about a test result, or a new chemotherapy regimen?  I worry more about the logistics and side-effects; the need itself is no longer a concern.

A failed test?  Man I’ve seen so many horrible test results in the past few years it’s almost funny to me now.  “Yep, still on the train to Suckville.  Next.”  What else do you summon in protest when they’re ALL bad, except dark laughter and a few tears snuck in when nobody’s watching?

I have my moments.  I have entire weeks, as my wife can tell you.  But most of the time, regardless of how dark it gets inside, I try to keep it positive.  Who wants to be around negative people all the time?  So I tell black jokes about my health that are probably uncomfortable for people to laugh at (my wife hates those) but make me smile while I try to ignore the situation and just do what I can to make it through the day.  I don’t think more than a day ahead as I’ve found that leads to thinking about things that can blow major holes in the emotional walls, and I breathe a lot.  Lots of sighs too.  You can’t really do anything else.

So that’s the answer.

You get used to it BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO.  Because responsibilities, and guilt, and all the other fun things you’ve brought as baggage (or wreckage) to the party.  Because if *I* can’t deal with it, how will anyone else dealing with my life?

Tony Robbins, I am not.  Sorry.  I’ve been asked some permutation of this almost since the beginning and it’s the only answer that rings true to me anymore.  You deal with it because there’s no other choice.  If you want to take into that cancer fighter’s angst and let the world know how you’re going to beat this goddamn thing, more power to you.  If you want to stay in bed all day bemoaning your fate, hey, that’s your life choice and it’s not mine to criticize — trust me I get it.  Me?  I just try not to think about it.  I already have, do, will.  I’m far more interested in the few parts of my life I can salvage outside of this shitshow than to dwell on it any more than I already have to.

“It” doesn’t get better.  I do, at rationalizing, being pragmatic, avoiding the disasters and trying to stay positive, if possible, but at the least stay standing.  I can’t do more than that.

“Why didn’t daddy take better care of himself so he’d still be here?”

I do that to myself a lot, have that conversation that is. This situation constantly leads to these sketchy little daydreams, envisioning on a micro level what the world will be like when you’re gone. I think I did that before this all began, but death takes on a much more real and imminent feeling with a cancer diagnosis.  It causes guilt, immense amounts of it, that are totally unfair but that you have to deal with.  I wonder sometimes if a lot of folks sadness about cancer comes from that.  On the bright side at least I know this is just a mental game being played and to not wallow in it too much.  But if you can’t accept the truth, as painful as it is, then what can you accept?

It’s because I just didn’t, Ariana.  Because I was selfish.  Because I knew smoking and chewing tobacco was a bad idea and did it anyways.  Because I knew that that food was fucking garbage but ate it anyways.  Because I chose to ignore that all the chemicals and preservatives and food colors were most likely not doing me any favors.  Because I had wifi and wireless signals caressing my DNA for 40+ years and who knows what impact that had.  Because I drank too many Diet Dr. Peppers and touched the wrong bathroom door handle. Because I never thought it would happen to me.  Who knows?  In the end because I was weak somehow, and the giant invisible hand of Darwin or [insert deity here] decided to clean up the gene pool.

And I will be sorry, and feel a guilt so large that nothing can assuage it, every second of every day, until the day they take me from you.  But until then I’ll try to just breathe and do what I can to stick around a lil’ bit longer, spoil you a bit, and see what happens to us.

So here’s to the next chemotherapy, bring that fucker on.

Almost free …

I get to leave! Waiting for paperwork now. The folks at PSL actually saved my life … from another medical facility. Bizarre to be in a situation like that, but the folks here are awesome. And now I get some family time while the CBCI folks rethink some of my dosages in this clinical trial. So a week off chemo to heal some more, sunshine and the wife and kiddo.

Thank you all again for the notes and stuff — that has helped immensely through this.

From hospital to … hospital?

Got discharged from Sky Ridge yesterday with wrong diagnosis which didn’t end well. Amy drove me down to PSL today after coordinating with my oncology team — this is where CBCI works out of. In good hands and confident we’re on track to get me home safe, been a long goddamn week though.

Thank you all for the notes, visits and texts — in a week I seriously thought was my last one it’s meant a lot.