Group sessions and ASH.

I’ve had one of the worst weeks of my life, emotionally, so if this is discombobulated it’s because I am. Going to avoid getting into why, however, as it’s so ugly, anxiety-inducing and just plain wrong it’s a no-fly zone for now. Been fighting off a serious depression for a week straight and it’s taking everything I have just to maintain.

I did want to get a few things down on “paper” however, as it were — this is the Magellan aspect of writing for me, this hope that in just typing I can find connections, put my life in order, discover what the REAL problem is, exorcise something, whatever.

So one thing that’s somewhat interesting is my only real-life (as opposed to online) friend who has Myeloma, Mary, convinced me to go to a monthly support group in Denver with her this past Saturday.  Specifically we went to the Denver Multiple Myeloma Support Group, which meets downtown on the second Saturday morning of each month. It was interesting, and surprisingly (at least to me) I think I’ll try to make it regularly.  Oddly enough I tend to get a bit introverted speaking about myself in person so I don’t generally do group-speak activities but I figured fuck it, I’ll get to hang with a friend I don’t get to see enough and be supportive, plus why not?

So the agenda changes depending on whether they have speakers or not but this time the meeting started with a nice meditation and then we just went around the room sharing our stories. Obviously for privacy reasons I’ll avoid relating individual’s information but interestingly for there being only eight folks this particular morning there was a wide variety of Myeloma experiences, from a 19-year survivor to someone who just got diagnosed and hadn’t even started treatment yet.

One person’s experience was actually similar to mine in that they found out via a blood test that looked bizarre to a doctor instead of some catastrophic Myeloma-related incident.  And I mention this only because the person noted while relating their story the experience of that moment where you’re hoping it’s MGUS (“monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.”).  Which for the uninitiated requires a bit of explanation — so MGUS is like a precursor to Myeloma with something like a 30% chance of blossoming into the wonderful gift we know and love (no idea where I remember that stat from, so apologies if it’s incorrect).

Point is it’s what you want your blood test to say when a doctor sends you to a hematologist to explain the weird blood test results. It’s a significant moment because here you are in the hematologist/oncologist office with what feels like your last chance that this is all some crazy mistake, that the nightmare of sitting in a cancer doc’s office isn’t really happening, primed and ready for the biggest sigh of relief you’ll ever have in your life … and then WHAM. Nope, sorry, fuck-o, you lose!

It feels like I’ve walked this road for so long that combined with the chemobrain I look back sometimes and wonder at it all, especially when I recall moments like that.  More, I wish I had some pithy useful conclusion so far besides “What a long and bizarrely tragic shit show,” heh.

Onward and upward, this weekend is the American Society of Hematology’s big annual meeting.  I’ve been following it on Twitter as best I can and re-Tweeting links to articles normal human beings can understand (i.e., minimal obscure acronyms and jargon), so check the Twitter feed if you want some highlights focused just on Myeloma.  All the big hitters in the industry seem to be there, including both Drs. Mikhael and Matous, my favorites, so it’s been interesting for sure. I’m not sure what the big takeaways are from the weekend yet in terms of new stuff for Myeloma, but my list to discuss with Dr. Matous this coming week includes:

  • what’s going on in CAR-T for Myeloma
  • what is my sub-type?
  • what’s all this about doubling up on the flu vaccinations
  • what’s the story with Venetoclax for Myeloma, and
  • what are the latest thoughts on transplants. Seems like I’m seeing more and more about allogeneic (other peoples) stem cells for relapsed Myeloma victims like me as opposed to a second autologous (your own).

No cure yet though. Also if you want a wrap-up Dr. Mikhael is one of the three experts who is going to present a free streamed discussion on the latest trends in treating Myeloma on Monday night which you can watch here.

That’s pretty much all I feel like unburdening myself with right now. I have a big meeting with the Doc on the 13th where we’ll be discussing what we do next, so I’ll post again this week when I’ve had time to process.  Toodles.

 

Straightening out the curves.

Thanks to input from a friend I decided to move my blog from Blogger to WordPress, which has been pretty easy.  Not so easy, however, has been the emotional impact of having to go back and read the whole thing to tag everything right, get the formatting fixed, etc.

Whoops.

In doing so, however, I realized there is a lot of information missing, gaps in the story that I should probably fix.  I know I don’t have all of the information some want readily available — I think I’m a bad blood cancer patient, honestly.  Everyone I talk to leads with their numbers like they’re introducing themselves as Patrick McGoohan’s Number 6 from ‘The Prisoner’ … “I am M-Spike 1.9 IgG 2,400,” if you will.  Me, I barely pay attention. What difference does it make?  I know the trends.  I have an incurable but treatable cancer, which sounds good except when you’ve already blown through several treatments in less than that many years you start wondering just how “treatable” it is.  Plus if I knew my #’s better I’d be a walking ball of anxiety.

I often ponder putting together an Excel spreadsheet tracking it all, the typical “hi, I work in finance” answer to the world’s problems.  Much like a surfer waiting for a wave to ride, as anyone who partakes can tell you I’ve been waiting for a good solid Dexamethasone blast o’ energy to do that.  Have a box with all of the lab results and paperwork just waiting for the chemical motivation to kick in.

So of course I just got taken off of Dex.

Someday, Excel, SOMEDAY.

Dex, for those unaware, is the steroid they add to EVERY (seemingly) chemo treatment I’ve seen so far for multiple myeloma.  My understanding is it increases the efficacy of the chemo drugs, allowing for a lower chemo drug dosage?  Either way with very few exceptions I’ve been on this crap for almost four years now, and sometimes if you get the timing down you can be super productive.  I cannot tell you how many times I’ve re-organized our pantries, the garage, the spare closets … great drug if you don’t mind the weight gain and ‘roid rage that accompanies it.

Anyhow, we’ve entered rambling town, so let’s rein it back in a bit.  Like I was saying,  when reading back through things I found a lot of gaps and events that don’t make sense unless you know a bit more about what was happening at the time.  While I don’t write here to tell a clean, linear story, I bow to the logic that one needs to be told at least to a certain degree.  So a few things that I think will help color in the gaps:

  • Diagnosed in mid-2013 when some GI-related blood tests for recurrent diverticulitis showed red flags.  Went to RMCC at Rose for further testing, second opinion at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN with Dr. Arleigh McCurdy.  Decide to have MC “take over” my care with the local oncologist, Dr. Alan Feiner, at RMCC in charge of administrating everything locally.
  • Began CyBorD chemotherapy, consisting of Cytoxin, Velcade and Dexamethasone.  Velcade was done at RMCC at Sky Ridge, the closest RMCC to my office / home.
  • Dr. McCurdy quit the MC for husband’s job but recommended her colleague, Dr. Joe Mikhael, at the Arizona Mayo Clinic.  Went down to meet with him, have him take charge of my care, and plan for a stem cell transplant.
  • Began therapy locally, and eventually anti-depressants.
  • Temporarily move to Arizona in February 2014 for autologous stem cell transplant (“SCT”) at the Mayo Clinic (Day Zero = 2/26/2014, some consider that their new birthday for some reason).
  • Back to Colorado in late March 2014 (30-day post transplant mark).
  • Summer 2014, 100-day SCT results don’t indicate remission, Dr. Mikhael begins Revlimid with Dexamethasone as a treatment.
  • September 2014, lower Revlimid dosage (too hard on my blood cell counts) from 25 mg to 15 mg.
  • January 2015, switch local oncologist from Dr. Feiner at RMCC to Dr. Matous at CBCI.
  • February 2015, Dr. Matous adds Ninlaro (oral version of Velcade) to Revlimid and Dex therapy.
  • Summer-ish 2015, Dr. Matous ends Ninlaro, adds Biaxin for a few months (BiRD).
  • Tried to wean off of Lexapro (the way you are supposed to).  Bad idea, turns out I was relying on it a lot more than I thought!
  • May 2016, start clinical trial for Pomalyst, Dex and ACY-241.
  • Mid-2016ish begin intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) since I’m getting sick (pneumonia) on almost a monthly basis.
  • October / November 2016, decide to stop going to Mayo Clinic.

So that should clear up a few blanks, anyhow.  Again it would probably be more helpful if I had all the #’s handy to show my stats at some of those bullet points, sorry.  I also feel like there’s a lot that happened in 2015 as well that I’m forgetting but I wrote nothing down — let’s just call 2015 a rough year and move along.  So mix in 4 hospitalizations for pneumonia in 2016, 3-4 diverticulitis attacks and here we are ready for a stomach surgery and off any chemotherapy (and out of that clinical trial).  That should bring things up to date, but thanks to chemobrain I may add to this later.

Oh yeah, the Mayo Clinic decision at the end there?  Given that I was in the clinical trial this year and Dr. Matous and Mikhael were pretty much eye-to-eye on everything to begin with, I made the call to can the MC trips after having to cancel two at the end of the year due to illness.  I love Dr. Mikhael but it became kind of silly for me to blow $1k or more every three months while in the trial to go down there and have him look over things that we couldn’t really change (since I was in a trial).  Perhaps someday I’ll go back but I have full faith in Dr. Matous and CBCI for now, and if I do another SCT it will be at PSL here with the CBCI crew instead of in Arizona again.

Shame, I’ll miss the banana bread french toast at Butterfields and Z Tejas.  And renting a Mercedes from Sixt — sometimes along with “food for the soul” you need an auto for the soul as well.

I wanted to address something from a comment last week because I’ve been pondering it the last few days.  In it the mother of a friend who is going through chemotherapy for another form of cancer noted that she didn’t know how I could “bounce back” from a failed trial.

Here’s the happy smiley cancer answer, which I’m posting in this blog from atop Mt. Everest after doing a free-climb without oxygen for blood cancers right before a helicopter whisks me away to a raw vegan meal so I have some energy for the 1,000k or whatever marathons are called now I’m running in this afternoon and then tonight where there’s a photo shoot for just my smile because gosh ducky darnit, I’m just so happy and lucky to have cancer and yay puppies!  There’s always another wonderful chemotherapy to try, and we’re all sure the next one’s going to have less side effects and I’ll be on it 20 years from now!  Hey here’s my two dogs now, Hope and Cure, to tell you in doggy sign language about how me having cancer has improved their lives!  So buck up, little trooper, there’s nothing to worry about!

Have you met that person yet?  They always seem fake to me.  I know that’s unfair, but I can’t help it.  Nor can I help wanting to punch them in the nuts.  People like that, in situations like this, make you feel even worse than you normally do in my opinion.  You can’t really say anything either, because we’re all fighting the same battle.  Hell I envy those people, although I question whether they really exist — either way it doesn’t work for me.  Either it feels like I’m lying to myself, or I’m lying to myself.  So how do you really deal with bad news on this wonderful path we’re on?

Anyways, here’s the secret:  I don’t think about it.

So just don’t think about your cancer, folks.  Next question?

Really though, that is the answer.  This is a horror show that never ends.  It doesn’t take a day off.  No matter what I do this cloud doesn’t go away.  It’s in every car I drive, every waiting room, every ceiling tile I stare at in a hospital.  It sits next to me at lunch, picks the radio station and next song on my commutes.  I strap it in right after Ari is in her car seat, and I tuck it in at night right next to me.  In fact there’s only one place I’ve found so far it doesn’t penetrate on its own, and I guard that jealously because it’s the only real relief I’ve had in almost four years.

I will die from multiple myleloma, most likely.  My daughter’s daddy will be taken away.  And if that’s not bad enough, because I’ve always had guilt issues, I feel a CRUSHING amount of guilt over that fact on a daily basis (the daughter bit).  It taints every possible thing I do, bar none.  So I’m driving to, say, work, and instead of the usual daydreams you’d get doing that I get a sudden image of my daughter crying in some hospital about why daddy didn’t take care of himself better so he didn’t die.  Or I replay actual conversations I’ve overheard between my daughter and wife about how daddy can’t play right now because he’s sick and needs his rest (that happens more than I’d like).

I can keep listing those, but this isn’t Monday Depression Spiral with your host, Rich.  How do you deal with the constant stream of disappointment?

Simple. You don’t.

What else can you do?

Should I blast out of my chair in the doctor’s office, shake my fist at the sky and scream “Why, WHY??!!” in some Oscar-winning performance every time we swap to a new chemo?  That just sounds exhausting.  Maybe I could shout about how it’s all so unfair?

So I suck it up, get in the car, try not to think about my daughter and if I do, save the tears until the sunglasses are on and just drive, man.  Music up, all energy on banishing any thought.  Just another day.  Don’t think.  Do.  It’s just a day, just a moment in time.  Because in the end, and this is really the point, I have to function, regardless of what LabCorp or a doctor says.  I have a kiddo, and a mortgage, and responsibilities.

I am going to die from this.

“Oh well.”

Does that seem cavalier?  I’ve been dealing with the concept of my own demise daily since I was diagnosed.  I don’t want to die (well mostly I don’t), but I’ve had almost four years to come to grips with the concept.  I’m not surprised anymore.  Trust me I’ve gone over every possible permutation, scenario … it just doesn’t bother me a hell of a lot at this point.  So what is the point of stressing about a test result, or a new chemotherapy regimen?  I worry more about the logistics and side-effects; the need itself is no longer a concern.

A failed test?  Man I’ve seen so many horrible test results in the past few years it’s almost funny to me now.  “Yep, still on the train to Suckville.  Next.”  What else do you summon in protest when they’re ALL bad, except dark laughter and a few tears snuck in when nobody’s watching?

I have my moments.  I have entire weeks, as my wife can tell you.  But most of the time, regardless of how dark it gets inside, I try to keep it positive.  Who wants to be around negative people all the time?  So I tell black jokes about my health that are probably uncomfortable for people to laugh at (my wife hates those) but make me smile while I try to ignore the situation and just do what I can to make it through the day.  I don’t think more than a day ahead as I’ve found that leads to thinking about things that can blow major holes in the emotional walls, and I breathe a lot.  Lots of sighs too.  You can’t really do anything else.

So that’s the answer.

You get used to it BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO.  Because responsibilities, and guilt, and all the other fun things you’ve brought as baggage (or wreckage) to the party.  Because if *I* can’t deal with it, how will anyone else dealing with my life?

Tony Robbins, I am not.  Sorry.  I’ve been asked some permutation of this almost since the beginning and it’s the only answer that rings true to me anymore.  You deal with it because there’s no other choice.  If you want to take into that cancer fighter’s angst and let the world know how you’re going to beat this goddamn thing, more power to you.  If you want to stay in bed all day bemoaning your fate, hey, that’s your life choice and it’s not mine to criticize — trust me I get it.  Me?  I just try not to think about it.  I already have, do, will.  I’m far more interested in the few parts of my life I can salvage outside of this shitshow than to dwell on it any more than I already have to.

“It” doesn’t get better.  I do, at rationalizing, being pragmatic, avoiding the disasters and trying to stay positive, if possible, but at the least stay standing.  I can’t do more than that.

“Why didn’t daddy take better care of himself so he’d still be here?”

I do that to myself a lot, have that conversation that is. This situation constantly leads to these sketchy little daydreams, envisioning on a micro level what the world will be like when you’re gone. I think I did that before this all began, but death takes on a much more real and imminent feeling with a cancer diagnosis.  It causes guilt, immense amounts of it, that are totally unfair but that you have to deal with.  I wonder sometimes if a lot of folks sadness about cancer comes from that.  On the bright side at least I know this is just a mental game being played and to not wallow in it too much.  But if you can’t accept the truth, as painful as it is, then what can you accept?

It’s because I just didn’t, Ariana.  Because I was selfish.  Because I knew smoking and chewing tobacco was a bad idea and did it anyways.  Because I knew that that food was fucking garbage but ate it anyways.  Because I chose to ignore that all the chemicals and preservatives and food colors were most likely not doing me any favors.  Because I had wifi and wireless signals caressing my DNA for 40+ years and who knows what impact that had.  Because I drank too many Diet Dr. Peppers and touched the wrong bathroom door handle. Because I never thought it would happen to me.  Who knows?  In the end because I was weak somehow, and the giant invisible hand of Darwin or [insert deity here] decided to clean up the gene pool.

And I will be sorry, and feel a guilt so large that nothing can assuage it, every second of every day, until the day they take me from you.  But until then I’ll try to just breathe and do what I can to stick around a lil’ bit longer, spoil you a bit, and see what happens to us.

So here’s to the next chemotherapy, bring that fucker on.

Back in Scottsdale.

Sitting in a hotel room less than a mile from the Mayo Clinic, having already done my blood work appointment and trying to fill up the time until I see my doctor tomorrow.  Then home again.

It’s been a long, hard month.  One of the big things I have to discuss with the doctor here is changing my chemotherapy regimen somehow — both I and the Denver oncologist believe it’s too damaging to my immune system.  I’ve gotten sick every month at the end of the cycle since I started the Revlimid, culminating with 5 days in the hospital this month when I came down with bacterial pneumonia.  Either the dosage needs to change or I need a new drug, I guess.

Feeling really fatalistic lately.  On one hand perhaps that’s silly, seeing as how outside of fatigue I still am not sure I’m feeling the effects of the cancer so much as the drugs I’m being treated with.  Still, being in the hospital for a week, getting sick every month … it adds up, mentally and emotionally.  Having my daughter visit when I was in the hospital was really touch — the look on her face, the fear, until I won her over by showing her how I could make the bed move.

I sat today next to a pretty young girl at the Clinic who was with her father.  I watched as she helped him plug in his chair, talked to the nurse — 16, maybe?  I wanted to talk to her, to ask her what it was like to have a father wheelchair bound, sick, but even were it appropriate to ask I couldn’t.  This is the raw vein open, the thing that I keep coming back to.  We talked about it in therapy last week, how I really don’t fear death on a personal level.  I have nothing personally left on my bucket list that means enough to bemoan fate about.  But not being there for my daughter?  The thought instantly shrivels my soul, hurts in a way I can’t express and can’t linger on for more than seconds without dying a little inside.

I was listening to a podcast recently on World War I, and the podcaster (Dan Carlin) was talking about a letter a young British soldier wrote to his wife the night before the Battle of Somme, which the soldier did not survive.  Carlin noted that even were it in the end not neccesary, just the penning of such a letter would scar your soul.  Having written so many of them in the past year to my daughter, I can assure you it does.

Being hospitalized for pneumonia as a cancer patient really had me thinking hard about death lately, compounded by a recent death of a high school acquaintance that left behind a widow and two young children.  A lot about death.  In fact I decided that I wanted that soldier’s letter read at my funeral, whenever that may be, as I don’t think I could really put into words any more effectively exactly how this has all felt, what I live with every waking moment of every day.  I’ll close with that, I think, and update this again when I have something new to discuss.

I do not want to die.  Not that I mind for myself.  If it be that I am to go, I am ready.   But the thought that May never see you or our darling baby again turns my bowels to water.  I cannot think of it with even the semblance of equanimity.  My one consolation is the happiness that has been ours.  Also my conscience is clear that I have always tried to make life a joy for you.  I know at least that if I go you will not want.  This is something.  But it is the thought that we may be cut off from one another which is so terrible and that our babe may grow up without my knowing her and without her knowing me.  It is difficult to face.  And I know your life wthout me would be a dull blank.  You must never let it become wholly so.  For to you will be left the greatest charge in all the world; the upbringing of our baby.  God bless that child, she is the hope of life to me.  
My darling au revoir.  It may well be that you will only have to read these lines as ones of passing interest.  On the other hand, they may well be my last message to you.  If they are, know thought all your life that I loved you and baby with all my heart and soul, that you two sweet things were just all the world to me.  I pray God I may do my duty, for I know, whatever that may entail, you would not have it otherwise.

 

– Captain Charles May, 22 Manchester Regiment
The captain, a former journalist and poet, died the next day.

Hi.

It’s been a while, hasn’t it?  I suppose that’s pretty rude of me — when you have a blog about having a terminal disease, vanishing for two months isn’t exactly “nice” to people who get news about you from it.  So sorry, for what it’s worth.  I know anyone I actually know personally that reads this, however, can (and does) text or call to get updates if I’m gone from here too long.

The news hasn’t been good which is the primary reason I haven’t written.  I’ve certainly thought about it a lot these past few months, but this is painful to me — understand that most of the time I keep composed about all of this by doing my utmost NOT to think about it.  I can’t do that when I write, however — it just all comes streaming out and most of this cancer-related stuff is really hard on me, emotionally, to keep going over and over.  But I will try to keep this updated more.

To make a long story as short as possible, I was doing pretty good mentally and emotionally and then I got my 60-day results.  They indicated that the stem cell transplant hadn’t been very effective.  That subsequently sent me spiraling into depression but I still tried to keep my spirits up, telling myself that Dr. M. at the Mayo Clinic had said the 100-day results were really the ones to pay attention to.


Unfortunately, the 100-day results, as I found out the first week of June, weren’t anything to cheer about either.

So, best case scenario at the 100-day was that my bone marrow biopsy indicated I was in remission and I wouldn’t have to do any maintenance chemotherapy.  Next best would be having to do maintenance chemotherapy, which is a low-dose chemo designed to, well, “maintain” things.  Then there’s me — I get to start a full chemotherapy regimen, this time with Revlimid and Dexamethasone.

My wife was NOT excited about the dex.  Apparently I roid-rage pretty badly on it.

Since then I’ve just been trying to keep my head up, you know?  I was in a bad, BAD funk after the 100-day visit.  My doc tried to be somewhat reassuring, but even he admitted this was not what he had hoped for.  He described my disease as “stubborn.”

But all I could think about was my daughter back home.

Here’s the thing, and I guess I’ve written about this before.  I don’t care if I die, really.  I’m certainly afraid of the concept, as much as I can get my head around it (can anyone?).  But it’s not like I would be leaving a personal life unfulfilled … EXCEPT for where my daughter’s concerned.  I don’t have a big bucket list of things that are all that important at the end of the day; most of my bucket list, in the end, is pretty frivolous (dive trip destinations,etc.).  I’ve made great money, and provided for my family financially and with a home.  So I boil it all down and all that is left, with all due respect to my wife, whom I love, is my daughter.  She’s all that makes me smile anymore.  And now here we are again, with me wondering whether I’ll make it to her being a teenager.

I think I’ve written about this before, but the hardest part, in some ways, is the perspective I’m forced into with this.  Take Sunday, for example.  My daughter (with help from mommy) woke me up with hugs, kisses and “I love you’s.”  I’ll never forget that.  Ever.  She, on the other hand, will probably not remember it very long since kids tend to forget everything before age 5.  So the things that are so important to me she won’t even remember.  What will she get to remember?  My last years, when she’s still in single digits?  I’m tormented, haunted by this on a daily basis.  Almost as bad is that I’ve realized there really is nobody who knows me well enough to let her know, later in her life, who I was.  I try, with the letters I’ve been writing her and storing in the lockbox, but that’s not enough.  Who’s going to tell her that I may have failed a lot but I always tried to do the right thing?  About how much I loved diving, or video games, or Iron Maiden?  Who’s going to teach her to ride a bike, or how to play poker well, or how a love of reading will serve her so well?  Who’ll be there for her prom night, or teach her how to drive?  To give her a hug or hold her hand when it’s needed?

The problem with multiple myeloma, especially when it’s being “stubborn,” is statistically the answer to all of those questions is “not me.”  And for some of them the answer’s nobody, and that hurts a lot as well.  It would have been nice if at least she knew who I was.

I know I’m putting myself into the grave with that last paragraph, but that’s the pragmatist coming out.  This is the stuff that keeps me awake at night, every night.

I can discuss my disease with just about anyone without getting too upset — but mention my daughter and I start tearing up, instantly, uncontrollably.  I just can’t handle it.  I take Xanax nightly to keep from waking up at 3 am dreaming about my daughter crying and asking my wife where daddy is after I’m dead.  She asks me every morning where I’m going, and when I tell her “work” she sounds so sad and disappointed when she asks me to stay and play with her and I can’t.  There’s 1,001 more examples I could give, but in the end it’s like none of this is real except where she is concerned.  I still don’t feel sick at all, and as far as I can tell I don’t have any symptoms — had some odd bone pains here or there, but nothing I would be inclined to attribute to more than a bump or spending 5 hours in front of the computer with my forearm in a weird position.  But I’m assured, test after test, that I am in fact dying.

I think about that a lot — I would have no idea, as far as symptoms are concerned, that I actually have terminal cancer right now.  They keep telling me I do, though, and then my heart breaks again for that little kiddo.  I mean fuck me, right?  But she doesn’t deserve this.  She eats well, and she’s polite.  She’s so kind and has been through so much with her cleft palate already.  Why does she deserve to have her father die?

Enough.   I can’t be doing this at work right now.

I got the call today about my Revlimid prescription and I’ll probably be starting it within 3 days now that insurance has OK’ed it ($8,000 a month).  I get to take a host of other stuff with it as well — the dex, as mentioned, baby aspirin to keep from getting blood clots, the anti-viral stuff, an anti-biotic … add those to the LexaPro (which, sadly, I had hoped to get off if I didn’t need maintenance chemo) and the Xanax to sleep and I’m a walking pharma-dumpster.  Joygasm.

I’ll try to update more often.  Hug the people you love, you’d be surprised how fragile and fleeting life really is.

Stolen naps.

Ariana has skipped her naps for the past two days.  I, on the other hand, have taken one for the past two afternoons.  I think it’s partially due to the Neupogen leaving my system and partially due to increased activity — we’re doing a lot more lately to maximize my fun time with Ari, so the last several days have been a whirlwind of eating out, going to the zoo, going to one of those bounce houses with wall-to-wall trampolines, etc.

Nothing much new on the doctor front.  We met with Dr. M. for a final pre-admission office visit on Tuesday.  He reiterated that everything looks good, called me an overachiever for collecting enough cells for three transplants, and walked us through the tour de suck (my phrase) of how I’ll be feeling in the hospital and when.  Apparently 8-11 days post transplant are when it’s going to feel the worst.  I’d have to check my schedule but given my luck in the last year that’s probably when I told most people to visit.

On the bright side he lightened up on the “how it will be post-transplant” speech and said I should be fine, just avoid sick people and buffets.

I’m scheduled to get a PICC line in my arm (maybe they always go there, no idea) on Friday, and then I’m admitted to the hospital Monday.  Crazy, and kind of scary.

Missing Mischief and Trouble a lot lately.  It feels so odd, not having cats, and hits me at weird times.  I must be dreaming about them or something because I tend to feel the worst about it when I first wake up.  I’ve lost a few cats over my life but have never felt like this before; I mean I’ve always been crushed, but this sense of loss is truly overwhelming and it’s been a while now.  I have a digital picture frame that I loaded with photos of Amy and Ariana and one of me and Mischief at the hospital before he was euthanized, and it breaks me down every time it flicks across the screen.  I think I see him curled up on the bed for a moment one afternoon, but it’s just my black fleece.  I keep expecting to find him in my laundry basket, or to come running when I open something that crinkles or has a noisy lid.

I had hoped that being in a new surrounding like this, instead of being at home, would alleviate this to some degree but it isn’t.  On the bright side Dr. M. prescribed me some Xanax to help me sleep through the night again (stopped doing that in the last week) so at least I have another pill to combat it.

Quiet Sunday.

Got another 4.6 million stem cells yesterday so they pronounced me finished and let me get my catheter line taken out today.  Wasn’t too painful although I probably should have skipped looking when the nurse asked me if I wanted to see it.  Shnikes.

So 10 million cells harvested, well above the 6 I was shooting for.

Had to take it easy after I got home because with a borderline platelet count (borderline as in any lower and they would have given me some) this won’t heal as fast and can be serious if it rips apart or gets infected.  No lifting heavy stuff, no bending over, etc.  No showering either until at the earliest tomorrow morning, which is getting old.  Need a shave as well.

I only have two more appointments before I go into the hospital and start the chemotherapy at this point — a pre-admission office visit with Dr. M. and to get my PICC line installed.

As it gets down to the wire I’m getting more and more nervous about everything coming up.  As with previous milestones in this treatment, things are about to ratchet up the seriousness quotient again.

Woke up this morning having thoughts about Mischief as well and how much I miss him, which hasn’t really helped either.  Wish he was here.

My thoughts are disjointed, sort of like this entry.  Trying to figure out what to do with Ariana this week since when I go into the hospital a week from tomorrow we won’t see each other for almost 3 weeks (she can’t visit me).  Maybe we’ll go to the zoo or something — like to maximize my time with her, and I need to write her another letter this week too.  Amy’s step-father gets into town Saturday which will be great — not just to get some help, but we’ve got a fun dinner out planned (Brazilian steakhouse) and I know Ari will love seeing her grandfather.

Sad today, for whatever reason/s, and just can’t shake it.  It’s been creeping up slowly but surely lately as I get closer to going into the hospital.  It’s easy, even when laying there being harvested, to forget what you are there for and what you are doing.  As I’ve written before, however, when the reality comes crashing back it can be pretty brutal.  Not sure there’s ever any escaping that, any normalcy to be found here if I look too hard.

Just another cancer patient looking out from inside.