Screw “hope.”

How’s that for a title to set the tone?

I’m not that anti-hope, really.  It’s just … man everything is making me tear up today, and I’m fighting off a serious depression which I always find awkward. Hiding the sniffles and pretending it’s allergies or just “nothing.” Trying not to think about anything remotely sad (impossible for me, since even kindness makes me sad on days like this). Work is kind of a shitty place to just have tears start rolling down your cheeks.

Been like this off and on for a few days now. I don’t think it’s so much drug-related as just a hardcore realization of where I’m at in life, where I’m going, and how much it all sucks. I guess better this way at the start of a new chemo regimen than all hopeful just to subsequently get emotionally crushed like a bug like I did by that clinical trial though, eh?

Started up a new chemotherapy this week — Carfilzomib, Cytoxan and Prednisone (I refused the Dex so we substituted that). I can already feel it in terms of fatigue; the last two nights I have gone to bed pretty early and slept great, but can’t get up. After five years of this you start noticing little things about your body a lot more than I think normals (those of you without cancer) do. There’s something different keeping me from waking up in the last two days, I can just tell.

My shoulders are still a hot mess — I don’t see any way around getting some x-rays or something done as they hurt constantly and my range of motion is severely shortened. Feet are still numb, and I’ve noticed on our nightly walks that if I walk too far the numbness starts creeping up my legs until I feel like I’m going to fall down. My knees and hips feel extremely weak at that point too. In the hopes that this has more to do with not getting a ton of exercise or something I’ve still been going on the walks, but I’m concerned. And it’s typical — it’s not bad enough that my mind is ripping me apart, waves of depression taking down the wall I’m frantically trying to fend it all off with, but then I get these pains and aches on top of it all.

Because I’d feel pretty decent right now if it weren’t for the shoulders and feet/legs, and we can’t have that. Oh no, no respite for Rich.

Sorry … that’s dipping into the self-pity a bit much. Which I’ve been doing a lot lately, I realize. I can’t help it. Still blown away that I got no results from that clinical trial, in disbelief after all of those trips and tests and hospital time and uprooting my family that I got NOTHING from the bleeding edge of cancer research. It’s hard to explain how disappointing that is. I try, but it’s like trying to explain a color or smell — people just don’t get it. Not sure I do either. I was so sure that was the answer that I allowed hope to creep in — let myself imagine me doing normal life stuff again, whatever that means.  Vacations, things with my daughter, diving.

And it hurts seeing others getting amazing results.  I’ll admit it.  I just wanted to have some too, sorry. I went through all of the same stuff, how come it didn’t work for me?

*sob*

As any terminal can tell ya’, “hope” sucks. Hope ruins you. Because we’re always one test away from hope destroying us, you see?

Maybe you don’t. Probably better you don’t. I envy people their ignorance of this world. All I know is I allowed hope to enter my thoughts again and then got destroyed, and I’m still reeling from it to the point that I can’t even find it in my heart to be happy for those it’s worked for. And that sucks, man. It makes me feel like the shittiest human being ever. But I can’t help it. I wanted more time with my daughter, don’t you understand?

I should probably end this there if I wanted a clean, pithy blog entry, but I have all of these random thoughts in my head.  The only one that appears at the moment, however, is how this week Facebook reminded me it was my friend Julie’s birthday this week. Except Julie died a year ago from cancer. I guess nobody ever adjusted her FB page or anything you can do when someone on there dies. It was quite the brutal slap in the face, though.  RIP, you.

Had a friend in town this week offer, when she heard I had chemotherapy on Monday and Tuesday, to drive me to one. Was amazing just having someone there to talk to, someone who I knew cared, to take my mind off things. I always would see people with friends in infusion centers over the years of doing this and quietly sigh that those closest to me (wife, parents) never really offered (at least that I can recall, I think my wife went in the early days a few times but my memory is totally shot at this point). Ever the pragmatist I just kept quiet about it — plus there’s no way for that request to not sound guilt-trippy. But it always bummed me out, so after five years it was a nice change for a day at least.

Ariana has been hanging on me lately, mostly because I think she saw the devastation of  my wife and I at the clinical trial failing. She’s been very protective of me lately as well. It breaks my heart but gladdens it at the same time, if that makes sense. Never in my life have I EVER loved something so much it truly hurt until she came into my life AND I realized what she was.  Took me a while but I finally got it. And now fate seems hell-bent on taking me away from her.

One of her favorite words to misuse is the word “fair.”  If we tell her she can’t have desert because she’s not in the “clean plate club” tonight (hasn’t finished her dinner), she exclaims loudly that it isn’t fair. Usually with faked (and sometimes real) tears and a tantrum for really rough nights when she’s already hit the wall 30 minutes ago and now we’re coasting on fumes just to get through dinner.

But this … this isn’t fucking fair.  And I know it’s ridiculous in some ways to say that. I know that others have it worse.  Blah blah blahbitty blah blah. It isn’t fucking fair, and piss off if you want to ridicule the statement. I don’t care about the other 7 billion right now, just my daughter and I. And if there were a crueler thing than to spend every day wondering if this is the day you break her heart, if this is the day she starts saying “I miss daddy,” if today’s the day I just become a memory of a father, etc., then I don’t know what it is.

I’m just feeding it now, circling the drain at my office desk and I need to stop and get some work done before I totally break down. Anyhow, I’ll post up as soon as I get some results, if not sooner.  Keep an eye on the Twitter feed for random thoughts in the meantime if you care to.

A Third Option.

So last week I sat down for an office visit with the nurse practitioner, Megan, from my oncology team. We talked about the various problems I’m having, from the full-body pain to the sweats/chills, the severe depression, you name it. At one point she asked if she could give me a hug which is about when I broke down. She also told me that for what it was worth, if I were gone (we were talking about suicide) that I would be missed at CBCI. It touched me. Megan is one of those special medical personnel that actually cares and it comes through every time I talk to her.

She also made good on her promise to try to solve all of these problems, emailing me an action plan and calling me with Dr. Matous on the line later in the day. So here’s what we’re planning on in no specific order:

  • Increasing the hydrocortisone steroid back up to the original dosage to see if it helps with the temperature issues. Which, I’m happy to say, it seems to have had an impact with. Still sweating for no apparent reason at times but it’s not as frequent, and I’m hoping that trend continues. That really was driving me batshit insane.
  • Increasing the Oxycontin dosage from 40 mg tabs to 60’s but only after we give the steroid change a chance to see if it has an affect. Since it has I still haven’t filled that prescription.
  • Lighting a fire under the social worker’s ass I talked to a few weeks ago that never got back to me. By the next day I had a spreadsheet of all of their recommended providers and have already picked a few for my wife to review (going to deal with our marital issues first). Score one for Megan.
  • Check my testosterone level — presumably I’ll hear about this in one of my next visits.
  • Schedule another MRI of my spine to see why I’m still in pain.

I had an MRI earlier that day on my liver to explore what that spot was that showed up.  Turns out it is a benign liver hemangioma, which apparently is a tangle of blood vessels.  Either way she said that was very, very good news. I had no idea how dangerous liver cancer was until looking it up after hearing this (for once I skipped Dr. Google)  so I probably should have been more relieved, but at least it’s nothing serious or that needs to be treated.

I left the oncologist having obviously been crying and had several nurses ask if they could hug me as I made my way out, red-eyed. That made me feel nice, although it was hard — I have such a lack of touch in my life, and in-person caring, that it had a big impact. Not used to people being sweet to me, although I wish I was. Always have, really, I’ve just been too introverted to allow it in my life I guess.

On the way home I got a call from the oncology team with the big news — after reviewing everything, they want me to go back on chemo. One of the only drugs I haven’t tried yet, Carfilzomib, specifically. I’ll be mixing it with Pomalyst and Prednisone — it’s actually supposed to be done with Dex as the steroid but I refuse to take that again, so Prednisone it is. Nashville just isn’t calling and Dr. Matous let me know that he talked to Dr. Morie Gertz, the main guy in myeloma at the Mayo Clinic, and Gertz said the wait list for the trial I want is “substantial.” My doctor is also concerned that I still may not be strong enough for a stem cell transplant, so we’re going to try this chemo regimen.

I’m mixed on it. Part of me is glad just to have a plan, although this is going to be a pain in the ass (Carfilzomib is an IV-administered chemo done several times a week) logistics-wise. But maybe it works, you know? In the meantime there’s more time for spots to open in the clinical trials and for my body to hopefully strengthen to do another stem cell transplant. Either way I’m not in limbo anymore, and I think that status was adding to my mental distress.

On the marital front I sat down with my wife, sometimes kneeling, and worked out a plan to make our marriage a primary focus in my life if she’d give me a chance to prove I’m not the Dex-monster I became for years. Not only was she amenable but since then I can tell she’s working on it as well, and while awkward at times, we’re making progress. We had two dates this past weekend that were a lot of fun, just the two of us, and like I said above we’re going to be doing some counseling to try to fix the main problems. Either way it’s been pleasant for the last week or so and felt like family more than I recall having felt before– there have been times when I’ve felt like I was an enemy combatant in my own home and flat-out hated by my wife.

I just can’t take the cancer PLUS the realization that my marriage is dead — it made me realize I just didn’t have much left to live for without my family, and fueled a lot, I think, of the suicidal and hopeless thoughts I’ve been plagued with for so long now.  This is just too much, too painful, to go through alone or pretending, knowing you are making your partner miserable and that they were, at times, rooting for you NOT to survive. So fingers crossed.  I am trying, and that’s all I can do.

 

In-patient VTD-PACE, last night.

So here we are, last night (knock on wood) of the in-patient portion of VRD-PACE. Yeah I’m about ready to go stir crazy here so good timing.

Honestly, and kind of strangely, I’ve been in a really good mood all week. I’m walking a lot more than I usually do in the hospital (granted, I’ve been in 6-7 times in the last year for respiratory stuff and walking was not on MY top 5 list on those trips), cheerful.  Mostly bored, really.  I think the hardest part of this has been a combination of the steroids and the isolation — for all that I and others were worried about side effects, those apparently come next week. This week at Presbyterian St. Luke’s has mostly been about keeping occupied and not nauseous.

Although if you’re going to do inpatient chemo for 4 nights and 5 days, do it RIGHT.  Please note the following picture will offend and perhaps increase nausea in the Doomed who can’t look at any non-raw non-GMO non-vegan non-flavorful meal.  Or Darth Vader:

18699916_10154624950168097_2090791697427837296_n

The despecialized (un-re-edited) version of Star Wars and a 12″ from Fat Sully’s. Probably not the best anti-nausea fighter. Or the healthiest meal. Or the easiest to eat in a hospital bed, for that matter.

I care.

Awesome ‘za.

Hey when you live sort of in the sticks, being downtown with 3rd party delivery service is like a dream come true. Had a wicked bowl o’ ramen last night with some pork buns.

So yeah, not too bad really. The steroids have been the hardest medication to deal with so far. Forty milligrams a DAY of Dex has taken me beyond restless leg syndrome and into a Steve Martin comedy bit.

giphy1

Once I get to sleep I can stay there like a zombie, but being a night owl it’s soooo hard to actually get to sleep here for me. Trying an Ambien tonight … not a giant fan but I really cannot take another night of 40 laps around the onco-ward all tired but so jittery I can’t shut my brain off.

Also thanks to all those who swore to sneak me in some, erm, greener products. Appreciate and I love you but probably best if I don’t get booted out of the hospital, lulz.

Had some visitors today which was awesome (thanks!) and … I dunno what else, really.  This much time in a hospital all flows together until you aren’t sure what day it is and whether you’re coming or going, you know? I play games, watch movies off the home theater PC on the laptop and try not to puke.  I almost got caught today, that sudden salivation feeling you get, but the nurses responded so quick it was laughable.  They really have been great here: Julia, Tara, Campbell, Shasta, Rita, Kellie (note to self, check that list). I have to come in Sunday, Monday and Tuesday (FFS) for appointments so I’ll bring them something special.

You spend a lot of time thinking in the hospital, or at least I do. I’ve been wondering lately if cancer is just how we die now. In lieu of being eaten by saber-toothed tigers maybe this is the “new normal?” It’s hard to argue with some of the startling facts you find of incidence rates these days. Granted I would prefer, given the choice, of going in a slightly more pleasant way, but perhaps this is what we have to get used to. I can accept that, I think. In fact really the only cancer that truly gets me down, that I have no defense against, is childhood cancer. As mentioned before it’s just too goddamn much, too unfair.

I’m also having trouble not falling into the sheer hate aimed at the GOP lately. I try to see the best in folks, if I have time, but it’s been really tough for me lately.  I’ve always been a fiscal conservative and socially moderate agnostic, so I left the parties behind decades ago to force them to market better candidates to me.

Yeah, we see how well that plan worked out.

Seriously though — I’m reading an article today about some Washington Congresswoman and you just know, you KNOW, that if one of her three kiddos was diagnosed with our special sort of fun she’d be the first in line voting NO on this crap. Instead she’d be out sponsoring bills for medical marijuana, better healthcare, etc.

It’s just so fucking selfish, and as I come closer to the end — even if not a cancer-based one, who knows? — I find that flavor of selfishness so fucking disgusting that I just want to slap these people back to reality.  Why can’t they leave what’s in place there and just FIX it? That gets you re-elected. This scorched Earth policy is not. And as I reach further out from this little room on Twitter and Facebook and read story after heartbreaking story it becomes harder to control my disappointment and anger. Representative government, indeed.

If we don’t try to keep each other healthy, what’s the fucking point?  To die with the most toys like some Egyptian pharaoh?  For the love of the Almighty (whatever), c’mon already.

I don’t get it. And I apologize, for what it’s worth, for being a tiny bit political here — this week’s isolation has brought it out of me a bit on Twitter and I don’t like it.

Anywho, going home tomorrow night — my 24-hour chemos end at 4-5ish pm and then I’ll … well, “bolt” is a bad word for being released into southbound 5 pm Friday traffic, but I’ll be bolting as much as I can =)  I miss my daughter and wife, the comfort of their hugs. How they smell.  That sheer “rightness” of being home with them where I am supposed to be. I wish Mischief was there to greet me too but that’s a story for another time.

Talk to you soon and thanks for the kind DM’s on Twitter, comments here and other stuff — it means more than, well, actually it means what most of you already know.  but it’s pretty new to me so thanks and hugs.

VTD-PACE, days 2-3.

Just a quick update. Other than some nausea and some 4 am hi-jinks with a separate IV things are going smoothly.  Not enjoying the Dex at ALL even though I am in a cheery mood, really.  Hoping the drug who’s name I’ve forgotten since Monday is helping with that.

The biggest issue, really, has been boredom. When I’m on high-dose painkillers, my usual regimen for being in the hospital (due to the flu or pneumonia), the little aches and pains don’t bother me.  I’ve found this time I can’t get super comfortable, so I’ve been sitting in a chair in my room on the laptop when I can. Sadly I have a brand new lap desk sitting at home but everyone I know outside of the hospital that would bring it down here is sick =/

Second would be the Dex … normally I would get 40 mg a week from what I’ve experienced with with it before.  With this chemo I’m getting 40 a DAY.  Let’s just say my restless legs have started their own band.  I’ve also put on over 15 pounds in 3 days!!! All water weight and being retained by the various chemicals, but now I’m on Lasix which helps you pee.

A LOT.

That’s a pill btw, not the eye surgery.  My nuts see just fine.

One risk I think I talked about before with this, and I keep forgetting the damned name of, is that the PACE works quickly and explodes the bad cells (and some good ones too I’m sure). So the nurses and doctors monitor various things like calcium and magnesium (think that’s right, I’m a lil’ fuzzy).  Anyways, my calcium is up so hopefully that means this is doing some work — that’s part of my good mood.  If you have to go through this it might as well work, right?

I know the really bad side effects are days 7-10 once I’m home, but keeping my spirits up.

THIS.  WILL.  FUCKING. WORK.

That’s my prediction.

The nurses here at PSL are great on the cancer ward (and presumably elsewhere here) and have made this a lot easier.  Quick responses, intelligent ideas, etc.  Today’s nurse, the awesome Tara, is usually a charge nurse AND she lives with a coordinator for my care so I know I’m in good hands.  Add to that Kellie and Rita (mostly adding these here so I don’t forget the names for a thank you, btw) and it’s been a pretty smooth ride.

Been doing a ton of walking every day as well.  Not sure what that accomplishes but it breaks up the boredom and seems to be appreciate by the nursing and doctor staff.

Man this is a Facebook update, not a richvsmm post.  Guess that’s alright sometimes.  If it helps you rest easy that I haven’t turned into a Hallmark card, though; I did send Congressman Ken Buck from Colorado a “Rich” Tweet yesterday:

If it helps, though, my 5 1/2 year old Facetimed me yesterday without her mom’s help … after she got bored she just started staring at the TV over the top of the iPhone though so we cut it short, heh.