A Third Option.

So last week I sat down for an office visit with the nurse practitioner, Megan, from my oncology team. We talked about the various problems I’m having, from the full-body pain to the sweats/chills, the severe depression, you name it. At one point she asked if she could give me a hug which is about when I broke down. She also told me that for what it was worth, if I were gone (we were talking about suicide) that I would be missed at CBCI. It touched me. Megan is one of those special medical personnel that actually cares and it comes through every time I talk to her.

She also made good on her promise to try to solve all of these problems, emailing me an action plan and calling me with Dr. Matous on the line later in the day. So here’s what we’re planning on in no specific order:

  • Increasing the hydrocortisone steroid back up to the original dosage to see if it helps with the temperature issues. Which, I’m happy to say, it seems to have had an impact with. Still sweating for no apparent reason at times but it’s not as frequent, and I’m hoping that trend continues. That really was driving me batshit insane.
  • Increasing the Oxycontin dosage from 40 mg tabs to 60’s but only after we give the steroid change a chance to see if it has an affect. Since it has I still haven’t filled that prescription.
  • Lighting a fire under the social worker’s ass I talked to a few weeks ago that never got back to me. By the next day I had a spreadsheet of all of their recommended providers and have already picked a few for my wife to review (going to deal with our marital issues first). Score one for Megan.
  • Check my testosterone level — presumably I’ll hear about this in one of my next visits.
  • Schedule another MRI of my spine to see why I’m still in pain.

I had an MRI earlier that day on my liver to explore what that spot was that showed up.  Turns out it is a benign liver hemangioma, which apparently is a tangle of blood vessels.  Either way she said that was very, very good news. I had no idea how dangerous liver cancer was until looking it up after hearing this (for once I skipped Dr. Google)  so I probably should have been more relieved, but at least it’s nothing serious or that needs to be treated.

I left the oncologist having obviously been crying and had several nurses ask if they could hug me as I made my way out, red-eyed. That made me feel nice, although it was hard — I have such a lack of touch in my life, and in-person caring, that it had a big impact. Not used to people being sweet to me, although I wish I was. Always have, really, I’ve just been too introverted to allow it in my life I guess.

On the way home I got a call from the oncology team with the big news — after reviewing everything, they want me to go back on chemo. One of the only drugs I haven’t tried yet, Carfilzomib, specifically. I’ll be mixing it with Pomalyst and Prednisone — it’s actually supposed to be done with Dex as the steroid but I refuse to take that again, so Prednisone it is. Nashville just isn’t calling and Dr. Matous let me know that he talked to Dr. Morie Gertz, the main guy in myeloma at the Mayo Clinic, and Gertz said the wait list for the trial I want is “substantial.” My doctor is also concerned that I still may not be strong enough for a stem cell transplant, so we’re going to try this chemo regimen.

I’m mixed on it. Part of me is glad just to have a plan, although this is going to be a pain in the ass (Carfilzomib is an IV-administered chemo done several times a week) logistics-wise. But maybe it works, you know? In the meantime there’s more time for spots to open in the clinical trials and for my body to hopefully strengthen to do another stem cell transplant. Either way I’m not in limbo anymore, and I think that status was adding to my mental distress.

On the marital front I sat down with my wife, sometimes kneeling, and worked out a plan to make our marriage a primary focus in my life if she’d give me a chance to prove I’m not the Dex-monster I became for years. Not only was she amenable but since then I can tell she’s working on it as well, and while awkward at times, we’re making progress. We had two dates this past weekend that were a lot of fun, just the two of us, and like I said above we’re going to be doing some counseling to try to fix the main problems. Either way it’s been pleasant for the last week or so and felt like family more than I recall having felt before– there have been times when I’ve felt like I was an enemy combatant in my own home and flat-out hated by my wife.

I just can’t take the cancer PLUS the realization that my marriage is dead — it made me realize I just didn’t have much left to live for without my family, and fueled a lot, I think, of the suicidal and hopeless thoughts I’ve been plagued with for so long now.  This is just too much, too painful, to go through alone or pretending, knowing you are making your partner miserable and that they were, at times, rooting for you NOT to survive. So fingers crossed.  I am trying, and that’s all I can do.

 

Author: uwfacepalm

Father, husband, portfolio manager, cancer victim (multiple myeloma since 2013). Trying to navigate this goddamn disease as best I can while enjoying what time I have left via those relationships, friends, the UFC, gaming, MMJ, diving and helping teach it before this all went down as a PADI Assistant Instructor and a Dive Guide at the Denver Aquarium (well, before my white blood cell count went to shit thanks to the chemo/disease).

2 thoughts on “A Third Option.”

  1. Your NP sounds great. Carfilzomib-Pom-steroid is definitely state-of-the-art. I’m taking Pom 2mg plus Dex 20mg. This is a low dose of both, but I couldn’t handle any more. Hope it goes well.
    David

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    1. Yeah, Megan is one of a kind. I can’t remember how long I was on Pom, thinking back … I do remember it wasn’t that severe side-effect wise though. Good luck, and thoughts are with you David.

      Like

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