Many worlds I’ve come since I first left home.

Tomorrow I go back into the hospital for a week for the third, and most likely final, round of VTD-PACE. I’m not worried about the hospital stay, although that’s a pain in the ass, but more what comes after.

This weekend, my wife and daughter went up to Breckenridge with my wife’s parents.  I stayed at home, not really in any shape for outside activities or prolonged sun exposure. I spent most of that time thinking about things, which rarely is a puppydog and rainbows activity for me. And missing my daughter.

I dunno, folks.  Although I hadn’t even really recognized it, last week was my four-year anniversary of this nightmare.  I wish I had something to celebrate besides simply surviving, a verb that still seems so alien all these years later.  It seems to be the key word, though, especially this year and with these treatments.  Yeah, I’m still around … but in pretty rough shape.  I find it difficult, in fact impossible right now except in an abstract way, to even see the light as it were.  No matter how I slice it I’m staring down the barrel at several more hospital stays, doctors visits, tests … the list never seems to end. We’re off the rails now and in the “here be monsters” part of the map where the decisions are not written in stone like they used to be, and the choices make the earlier therapies seem like fun by comparison.

Another round of this?  Unlikely, but possible.  Dr. Matous never does four of these and rarely three, but this chemotherapy is all that has really made a dent in the last year so three it is.  A stem cell transplant next?  I’m at a zero level of excitement for that, but if it’s what the doctor wants I’ll certainly pay attention — I didn’t spend all the time and money to get top of the line healthcare to just ignore it.  CAR-T?  After the SCT, but apparently that’s got some serious hospital time as well.

If I think too long about it all I’m overcome with … well, I dunno.  It’s not depression, although there’s certainly some of that mixed into this.  What’s the word for an overwhelming sense of “fuck me running?”  Not sure.  I’ve felt for a while now like things have taken a turn this year, not necessarily in a good direction, and this is more of the same.  I think I’m in that stage a lot of patients seem to get to at some point where the treatments are so intensive both physically and time-wise that I’m rebelling, at least internally, at the toll it’s taking. I’m exhausted all of the time now and I have lower back pain so severe that even a double-dose of Oxycodone combined with some of Colorado’s finest isn’t getting rid of it, making getting up from a chair or couch an adventure in pain.

I have an MRI scheduled for my back tomorrow, and on the bright side, hey, I’ll get the good drugs to deal with the pain.  Generally when you answer the “what’s your pain at” with tears and a minor scream when you get out of the hospital bed they give you the good stuff.  So helloooooooo Fentanyl, it’s been too long.

I can’t seem to get back to a more carefree, happier headspace lately. I blame the steroids first and foremost, but it’s not as bad as it was before — perhaps because I know what to look for now?  I just bite my lip and boggle at the things my brain comes up with (bitter retorts, nasty replies, constant critical comments, etc.) and only let the good stuff come out of my mouth. But I can’t fake happy like I can fake politeness, and my emotional wall seems dangerously porous again. How do you really explain why you suddenly start crying out of nowhere when your thoughts stray to cancer and your child?  When you have to grit your teeth and clutch the armrests of your chair so tight you snap one in half to get your head back out of that particular hole?  How when most people daydream about summery stuff you’re idly pondering your own funeral?  It’s definitely a weird mental space to inhabit.

How do I understand and come to terms with the person I’ve become when the thoughts I have, as horrible as they are, come naturally?  I mentally go through a checklist of what to bring and do for this next week-long stint and without skipping a beat note to write a goodbye letter to my daughter.  A goodbye letter.  To my daughter.

Jesus.

You try it.  Maybe it’s just me but I don’t know how to deal with things like that without opening the floodgates.  Which is a good look on top of the bald head and hairless face, let me tell ‘ya.

But yeah, as my health has been much more precarious this year I’ve realized if I were taken suddenly there’s nothing but scattered writings and pieces — I need to know there’s more, a direct connection.  So I have some writing to do.

That should be fun.

Decided I want the Dead’s “Brokedown Palace” played at my funeral, although not in an obnoxious “OK everyone listen to this song” way. Just on loop until the festivities, as it were, start.  Probably quote this in the aforementioned letter as well.  Something powerful about this song that has always made it stick in my mind:

Fare you well, my honey
Fare you well, my only true one
All the birds that were singing
Are flown, except you alone

Gonna leave this brokedown palace
On my hands and my knees, I will roll, roll, roll
Make myself a bed by the waterside
In my time, in my time, I will roll, roll, roll

In a bed, in a bed
By the waterside I will lay my head
Listen to the river sing sweet songs
To rock my soul

River gonna take me, sing me sweet and sleepy
Sing me sweet and sleepy all the way back home
It’s a far gone lullaby sung many years ago
Mama, Mama, many worlds I’ve come since I first left home

Going home, going home
By the waterside I will rest my bones
Listen to the river sing sweet songs
To rock my soul

Going to plant a weeping willow
On the bank’s green edge it will grow, grow, grow
Singing a lullaby beside the water
Lovers come and go, the river will roll, roll, roll

Fare you well, fare you well
I love you more than words can tell
Listen to the river sing sweet songs
To rock my soul.

Yes I listen to the Dead AND metal that makes even metalheads cringe at its heaviness.  The 4,000+ songs on my phone are an exercise in schizophrenic music habits.

Anyhow I’m just scrapping the barnacles off the soul here and preparing myself for the hospital stay, so sorry for the negative spiral.  Sadly I actually had something I was going to end with here that was positive, but of course chemobrain ate it before I could get fingers to keys.  Sigh.  Well one bright note, the GOP has failed to destroy our broken but somewhat functional healthcare system, so at least my Twitter feed will go back to cancer-related stuff instead of the incessant political Tweets.

Little victories.

See you in the hospital.  I’ll be the one eating a Chicago dog with a mustard stain on my hospital gown.

 

Author: uwfacepalm

Father, husband, portfolio manager, cancer victim (multiple myeloma since 2013). Trying to navigate this goddamn disease as best I can while enjoying what time I have left via those relationships, friends, the UFC, gaming, MMJ, diving and helping teach it before this all went down as a PADI Assistant Instructor and a Dive Guide at the Denver Aquarium (well, before my white blood cell count went to shit thanks to the chemo/disease).

3 thoughts on “Many worlds I’ve come since I first left home.”

  1. I am glad you are doing this writing … I don’t know why and I don’t know if it’s something that helps you, though I suspect that, one some level, it must.

    You are noble, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You do an amazing job of conveying the emotions and thoughts you are having as you fight this thing, Rich. I can’t even imagine how you are coping but you have always been a gifted writer and it’s clear that writing is an important outlet for you. I’m glad you are writing for your daughter, hard as that might be, although my continual prayer is that she will never have to read them.
    Don’t get mad at me for suggesting this because it’s just me wanting to try an alleviate some of your anxiety and help in any slight way I can, but since you are spending long periods of time cooped up, you might pick up a copy of “A New Earth” by Elkhart Tolle. He’s a brilliant German philosopher who teaches how to find peace in even the most horrible of circumstances and offers mental coping skills that have helped so many people. It’s powerful stuff — also very cerebral and tough to understand. It’s worth ploughing through though. Some of it may seem a little out there, but even if you reject some of the concepts, I promise that there are enough nuggets of truths and aha’s that make it worth the read. Plus, Oprah recommended it so what more does one need?
    Much love and prayers,
    DeAnna

    Like

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